• advertisement

Our Mental Health Blogs

What Is a Dry Drunk in Addiction Recovery?

What Is a Dry Drunk in Addiction Recovery?

Dry drunks are sober, but they act the same way they did in active addiction. These dry drunk symptoms will shed some light on who's a dry drunk and what to do.

If you spend any time at all in the rooms of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA), you will likely hear the term “dry drunk” referring to someone who is in addiction recovery and, in fact, still sober. I didn’t understand the term until I had been in the program for a while. I wondered to myself how could someone be a drunk when they were remaining sober. However, I learned that sobriety isn’t the same as recovery and a dry drunk is sober, but not actively recovering from his or her addiction.

Continue reading

Summer Blues, Schizophrenia, and Schizoaffective Disorder

Summer Blues, Schizophrenia, and Schizoaffective Disorder

The summer blues affect schizoaffective, bipolar type as often as the winter blues. Or maybe I'm depressed all the time. Learn more about SAD and schizophrenia.With schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, you can experience the “summer blues.” Schizoaffective disorder is a combination of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. I have schizoaffective disorder, bipolar type. For me, that means I’ve had a schizophrenic psychotic episode in which I thought I was being stalked by famous people, the Italian mafia, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). It means that I hear voices. And it means that I have bipolar mood swings, from manic highs to depressive lows. I usually tend to veer to the side of depression. I am a bit of a connoisseur of depression. I’ve experienced different flavors of depression before and after my diagnoses of schizophrenia and then schizoaffective disorder. One of those flavors is the summer blues with my schizoaffective disorder.

Continue reading

Anxiety and Panic Overstimulate the Brain–Mindfulness Helps

Anxiety and Panic Overstimulate the Brain–Mindfulness Helps

Anxiety and panic often overstimulate the brain by pulling in too much sensory information. Mindfulness helps during these times of panic. Here's why.

Anxiety and panic can overstimulate the brain, rocket our senses into hyperactivity, and make us feel wired. When we feel keyed-up and on edge, it can feel as though nothing will help. Here we are at risk of jumping right out of our own skin, which would do nothing more than increase both anxiety and panic, and there’s not a thing we can do to settle down. Or is there? It can seem counter-intuitive, but practicing mindfulness when we’re at our most agitated can help when anxiety and panic overstimulate your brain. 

Continue reading

Eating Trigger Foods in Eating Disorder Recovery

Eating Trigger Foods in Eating Disorder Recovery

Eating trigger foods in eating disorder recovery can feel terrifying at first. In time, it is easier. Here is how to reintroduce trigger foods into your diet.

Eating trigger foods in your eating disorder recovery can feel terrifying at first. The reason the foods are trigger foods in the first place is because they cause anxiety and trigger the neural pathway to act on our eating disorder pattern, whatever it may be. Eating trigger foods as a part of your recovery can be a freeing process.

Continue reading

Anyone Can Self-Harm, Not Just Those with Borderline

Anyone Can Self-Harm, Not Just Those with Borderline

While people associate self-harm with borderline personality disorder, not just people with borderline self-harm. Anyone can self-harm, self-injure.People with borderline personality disorder often self-harm, but that doesn’t mean they are the only people who do; let’s face it, anyone can self-harm. People associate self-harm with borderline personality disorder, which I understand, after all, self-harm is a symptom of borderline personality disorder. But it isn’t the case that these are the only people who self-harm. Self-harm can be a coping technique that anyone can pick up (unfortunately), whether they have a mental illness or not.

Continue reading

How It Feels When People Dismiss Depression

How It Feels When People Dismiss Depression

When people dismiss depression by telling you to just be happy, it can bring up painful emotions. Labeling these emotions can be a powerful way to feel better.I have had people I love dismiss my depression with, “Why can’t you just be happy?” There is still social stigma attached to depression, and even the people who care about us can be affected by it. I try to label the emotions that arise after somebody says something like this to me, and it makes me realize why hearing, “Just be happy.” can be so frustrating. I don’t feel good when people dismiss my depression and this is why.

Continue reading

The Power of Habit: Patience, Perseverance, and Peace

The Power of Habit: Patience, Perseverance, and Peace

The power of habit helps blissful people stay that way, and not-so-blissful people become that way. Which power habits sustain joy? Read this to find out.

There’s power in habit. Habit creates your life. People who live a blissful life do not possess unique character traits that separate them from everyone else. They do not have more luck or brains or money. What people who live a blissful life do possess are powerful habits, and these habits help sustain joy and fulfillment regardless of what is happening in their life.

Continue reading

3 Ways Rape Culture Impacts Rape Survivors’ Mental Health

3 Ways Rape Culture Impacts Rape Survivors’ Mental Health

Rape culture impacts a rape survivors' mental health in at least three different ways, not least of all PTSD. Read these rape culture ideas and fight back.

There are many ways rape culture impacts survivors’ mental health. Rape culture, in a nutshell, is believing that women exist solely for the sexual gratification of men, that their consent is irrelevant, and that they have to protect themselves from men’s sexual desires (Getting Raped: The Stigma of Being a Rape Victim). Three ways rape culture impacts survivors’ mental health are by teaching a survivor she is “damaged goods,” teaching a survivor it’s her fault she was victimized, and teaching a survivor her worth comes from sexual purity.

Continue reading

Mental Illness Can’t Be Cured with Love

Mental Illness Can’t Be Cured with Love

Mental illness can't be cured with love. Love helps a person cope, but love doesn't cure mental illness. Thinking so is dangerous to you and your loved ones.

Part of the romanticism of mental illnesses is that someone who is mentally ill can be cured by love or that someone can be a cure for someone else’s mental illness. We see this in media and it seeps into real life to the point that people don’t understand why we can’t stop being depressed or anxious for them (How to Cope With a Loved One’s Mental Illness). What people need to realize is although being loved can make dealing with mental illness easier, love does not cure mental illness.

Continue reading

Autism vs. Childhood Mental Illness

Autism vs. Childhood Mental Illness

Autism and childhood mental illnesses can look very similar at first glance. This article discusses what behaviors parents may see in both and how they differ.Many childhood mental illnesses involve behaviors similar to those found in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), commonly just referred to as “autism.” As a result, parents may hear the term “autism” mentioned when their child first exhibits worrisome behaviors. This first post on autism will look at the similarities and differences between autism spectrum disorder and childhood mental illness, as seen from a parent’s perspective.

Continue reading


Follow Us

Subscribe to Blog

  • advertisement

Comments

Mental Health Newsletter

Sign up for the HealthyPlace mental health newsletter for latest news, articles, events.

Mental Health
Newsletter Subscribe Now!

Mental Health Newsletter

Sign up for the HealthyPlace mental health newsletter for latest news, articles, events.

Log in

Login to your account

Username *
Password *
Remember Me