advertisement
advertisement

What is Dual Diagnosis and Why is it Difficult?

Here's what's happening on the HealthyPlace site this week:

------------------------------------------------------------------

Facebook Live This Wednesday

Managing stressful relationships during the holidays. That’s our topic for our Facebook Live this Wednesday at 8p ET / 7 CT. Our host, therapist, Emily Roberts, will be sharing helpful info and taking all of your personal mental health questions on any topic. Join us.

------------------------------------------------------------------


What is dual diagnosis? Find exactly what dual diagnosis is and why it is difficult to diagnose and treat at HealthyPlace

What is Dual Diagnosis and Why is it Difficult?

Dual diagnosis, also called co-occurring disorders, is the term used when someone has both a mental health disorder(s) and a substance use disorder(s). Diagnosing and treating co-occurring mental- and substance use disorders can be difficult.

What is the relationship between mental illness and substance abuse?

According to SAMHSA, people with mental illness are more likely than people without mental illness to experience an alcohol- or other substance-use disorder. In fact, in 2014, almost eight million adults in the U.S. had a dual diagnosis.

There’s a connection between the two, but there isn’t a direct cause-and-effect relationship. Substance use doesn’t cause mental illness, nor does mental illness cause substance use and abuse.

It’s not uncommon for people with mental health disorders to self-medicate with drugs or alcohol as an attempt to deal with their symptoms and function better. Unfortunately, the opposite happens and people become trapped in co-occurring disorders.

Is Dual-Diagnosis Treatable?

Dual diagnosis is indeed treatable. Initially, practitioners use screening tools to help separate mental health and substance use issues. Then, each diagnosis receives its own unique attention and treatment.

Someone experiencing dual diagnosis faces many challenges. With the right treatment and support, he or she can overcome the challenges and experience mental health.

Related Articles Dealing with Dual Diagnosis

Your Thoughts

Today's Question: : If you struggle with dual diagnosis, what effect did the addiction have on your mental illness? We invited you to participate by sharing your thoughts, knowledge, and experiences on the HealthyPlace Facebook page and on the HealthyPlace Google+ page.


continue story below

advertisement

From the HealthyPlace Mental Health Blogs

On all our blogs, your comments and observations are welcomed.

Feel free to share your thoughts and comments at the bottom of any blog post. And visit the mental health blogs homepage for the latest posts.

------------------------------------------------------------------

From HealthyPlace YouTube Channel

I'm Hannah. I Have Bipolar 2

Dating When Depressed or Hypomanic: Good Idea or Not?

Dating when you’re experiencing bipolar rapid cycling. Now, there’s a real challenge! I thought I’d share my experience with it. . (Watch Hannah)

------------------------------------------------------------------

Most Popular HealthyPlace Articles Shared by Facebook Fans

Here are the top 3 mental health articles HealthyPlace Facebook fans are recommending you read:

  1. Stigma Against Parents Who Raise a Child With Mental Illness
  2. Retrieving Memories Lost to Dissociation Caused by Trauma
  3. The Stigma of Taking Mental Health Sick Days from Work

If you're not already, I hope you'll join us/like us on Facebook too. There are a lot of wonderful, supportive people there.

------------------------------------------------------------------

Mental Health Quote

"No matter how bad things are right now. No matter how stuck you feel. No matter how many days you’ve spent crying and wishing things were different. No matter how hopeless and depressed you feel. I promise you that you won’t feel this way forever. Keep going."

Read more depression quotes.

------------------------------------------------------------------

That's it for now. If you know of anyone who can benefit from this newsletter or the HealthyPlace.com site, I hope you'll pass this onto them. You can also share the newsletter on any social network (like facebook, stumbleupon, or google+) you belong to by clicking the links below. For updates throughout the week, circle HealthyPlace on Google+, follow HealthyPlace on Twitter or become a fan of HealthyPlace on Facebook. Also, check out HealthyPlace on Pinterest and share your mental health pins on our Share Your Mental Health Experiences board.

back to: HealthyPlace.com Mental-Health Newsletter Index

 

Last Updated: 28 November 2017
Reviewed by Harry Croft, MD

Related Articles

Follow Us

advertisement

Mental Health Newsletter

Sign up for the HealthyPlace mental health newsletter for latest news, articles, events.

Mental Health
Newsletter Subscribe Now!

Mental Health Newsletter

Sign up for the HealthyPlace mental health newsletter for latest news, articles, events.

Log in

Login to your account

Username *
Password *
Remember Me
advertisement
X
advertisement
X
advertisement
X
Back To Top