• advertisement

Our Mental Health Blogs

Signs Your Friend Is Abused

Kasandra Perkins and possibly ten other women died at the hands of their partner on December 1, 2012 (4000 women killed by partners/year divided by 365 days/year = 10.96 dead women per day). Yet today, Internet news sources remember Kasandra Perkin’s boyfriend, the man who killed her before killing himself, and the jest of the commentary is, “We didn’t see this coming. He was such a great guy!” Typical.

Newsday reported “Friends of Perkins have said there was tension between the two that escalated after the birth of their daughter, now 3 months old, and a police source said the two argued about money.” Abuse escalates or begins after the abuser feels that the victim cannot separate from them. For example, after the birth of a baby.

Kasandra’s friends and family will undoubtedly look back over the past three months (at least) and say to themselves, “I should have noticed…” They will undoubtedly blame themselves for not seeing the truth, but it is not their fault that Kasandra is dead. It is her boyfriend’s fault. As the truth dawns on those who loved Kasandra, they may go through a personal hell of if only thoughts. Let’s keep them in our prayers.

Along with our feelings of sympathy, let’s do something else, too. Let’s get our heads out of the Internet news and gossip and focus on the people we love. Who among your group of friends could be on Kasandra’s path?

Signs Your Friend Could Be Involved With An Abuser

Coincidentally, also on Saturday, I asked my Facebook friends to brainstorm signs of abuse from the outside looking in. How might you know if your friend or family member was being abused? They came up with very insightful tells, and I want to share them with you.

Keep in mind that these signs of abuse occur not only after beginning a new relationship, but also when a relationship moves to a different level. Pay attention to the signs very closely if your friend’s relationship just changed in some way: engagement, marriage, pregnancy/child, moving in together, or any other change that shows the relationship is becoming more serious.

Things your friend may do

  • acts overly happy, suspiciously happy; you have a sense that they smile on the outside, cry on the inside (abuse victims can be very good actors)
  • questions their sanity or behavior while asking for your advice
  • asks partner how they feel about absolutely everything, can’t seem to make a decision without consulting their partner
  • avoids eye contact, especially if you press your friend for “what’s wrong” or try to talk to them about your suspicions of abuse
  • blame themself for partner’s behavior
  • calls the police to the house but denies there was an issue; says s/he overreacted or denies the call was for domestic violence (police reports are public record… just sayin’)
  • doesn’t have time to meet with you
  • excuses the things their partner does/says
  • explains partner’s possessive behavior, sees it as abnormal, begs you not to say anything to him
  • tells you of the horrible relationships in partner’s past or how the partner has one or more “crazy” ex-es
  • asks partner for money all of the time; rarely has cash or debit card to use
  • “freaks out” or makes an ass of themselves in presence of partner and you, but you can’t figure out why
  • begins using illegal substances or alcohol becomes a problem
  • minimizes what goes on at home
  • seems almost delusional, you think your friend could be making up problems where there are none (that you can see!)
  • seems defensive, thinks you judge them, explains things that need no explanation
  • seems to see their partner through rose-colored glasses, has unfounded optimism for the outcome of their last fight or for the relationship

Things you may notice about your friend

  • appears nervous or anxious, can’t relax; irratible or edgy
  • can’t “find the right words” to explain what is wrong
  • checks the time constantly, expected to be home at a certain time, constant texting/phone calls with partner when they’re apart
  • reports to partner before making a move
  • distant when you are able to communicate with them
  • partner’s jokes cause your friend pain; pain can show as contempt, sudden tears but no crying, over-the-top laughter and then quick withdrawal from partner’s presence, or any combination of emotions (you know your friend’s “normal” behavior – their reaction will not be “normal”)
  • loses interest in her hobbies or activities
  • develops low self-esteem, depression
  • sadness out of nowhere, sudden crying or anger
  • says nothing is wrong when there obviously is something wrong
  • your friend appears distraught or “off” but their partner appears vibrant and charming when arriving at your party
  • shrinks when partner enters the room
  • side conversations: partner speaks about how the children disappoint “them” and your friend apologizes on the side as if the children’s behavior is all their fault.
  • adheres to very traditional sex roles (not what your friend wanted before the relationship)
  • consoles and tends to sulking or angry partner instead of enjoying the party or going to the party
  • defensive of any suspicious behaviors you point out
  • gets nervous if partner drinks or uses other substances
  • goes overboard to make abuser look good
  • seems vulnerable, defeated
  • stops taking care of their own mental, emotional, physical and spiritual needs
  • has visible bruising or marks or wears clothes that could hide bruises
  • withdraws from friendship, no calls or visits, cuts off communication
  • withdraws from social events and family gatherings
  • friend hates their partner one day and wants to leave, then makes partner out to be a saint the next time you talk

Things you may notice about your friend from work

  • doesn’t attend company parties; avoids socializing with most people (especially the opposite sex)
  • often appears upset at work, you can tell they’ve been crying when they exit the restroom
  • spends much of the workday whispering into the phone
  • partner shows up at work and friend reacts strangely
  • work day interrupted by “family emergencies”
  • becomes overly anxious about leaving work late, especially when it is a last minute decision by the boss to stay late

Things you may notice about your friend’s partner

  • “steals the show” when victim has chance to shine or on victim’s birthday, favorite holidays, anniversaries, etc.
  • exhibits unfounded jealousy, paranoia
  • makes comments that belittle your friend, lies about your friend, attempts to make your friend doubt themselves or says “No, dear, this is what happened…” and changes your friend’s story ever so slightly (or completely)
  • makes openly derisive comments about your friend
  • may talk as if s/he rescued your friend from their last job, last relationship, themselves … and your friend may incomprehensibly agree
  • mentions your friend’s new substance abuse problem derisively but does not act in a compassionate, caring way – uses the addiction to blame your friend for most anything
  • seems too good to be true
  • comes on to you, will deny doing it
  • plys your friend with drinks and purposefully pushes their buttons
  • image is very important to them
  • confides in you about “problems” with your friend that you just can’t imagine existing

Trust Your Gut

After reading those lists, you may find the clues that your friend is being abused to be “circumstantial evidence”. Even if your friend shows marks from physical abuse, you cannot prove they are abused. Talk to a judge and I believe most of them would share your frustration. Your friend must realize they are abused for themselves and confide in you – you cannot make them tell you anything.

Sometimes, simply bringing domestic abuse out into the light will be enough to make a difference. Your friend, if they are being abused, may think that they are “crazy” and distrust their own perception. You broaching the subject of domestic abuse may be just what your friend needs to feel sane and safe enough to open up. When that happens, you can help them end the abuse.

Check here for more information on how to help an abuse victim.

6 thoughts on “Signs Your Friend Is Abused”

  1. My friend shows signs of being abused, she is pushing all of us away refusing to part take in any gatherings or drinks, she is extremely anxious and nervous about being around new people and is overly sweet to her friends asking us not to unfriend her as she can not come out as much as she likes. She had to ring her partner before she does anything and does not have any money of her own to spend. Recently, her balehaviour is worrying us because she is telling us stupid little white lies that she always gets caught out on, we are getting rather worried about her as she is pushing us away and not wanting to join in with kids events also. Last week one of her friends went to her house to pick her up to go to a kid disco that has been planned for a while, she has continously stated she would be coming on the Wednesday, the friend turned up at her house and no answer the curtains were drawn and also the back gate, back door and back windows curtains were all closed. The friend walked slightly to the end of the street to walk home when she went back to check and the previous items I listed were wide open;back door, back window and curtains. I just want some advice on what to do next to help my friend, everyone has seen the change in her and we are worried.

  2. I am not sure if my friend is abused, she says that her parents yell at her and insults her and insults her family and makes her feel unwanted and uncomfortable. I am scared she is being mentally abused and she hasn’t told me but physicall abuse too.

  3. I don’t know if I have been abused or not but I don’t feel like I’m safe when I’m with my parents! My mom likes to call me names like I’m a witch or I’m useless, she even once said that I wish that when you were in my stomach you died before even you were born, she hit me because I lost my bike and I had to hide my scars when I went to school, I put on a fake smile on my face everyday! My dad doesn’t even care about me all he wants is for me to come back home with straight A’s and if I even get a B he gets angry, he make me clean up his mess and if I talk back he yells at me! I have a young sister and she gets anything she wants, she gets toys, clothes, money and I I ask for something I have to do something to get it! I’m not aloud to go to any parties, I can’t meet my friends after school and when we have school projects i can’t go to my friends house to work on it.

    1. Anonymous, I suggest you go talk with your school counselor. If you don’t like the one assigned to you, ask to speak with one you do.

      Home should be a safe-feeling place. I’m sorry yours isn’t.

  4. It makes me sad to read this list, there are so many things that I can say describe my life and the way I got through on a daily basis. It is 18months since I left with my two boys from 14years of living with someone who constantly told me I was not social enough, had a fat butt, and was crazy in the head. Still he mucks his boys around when they are ment to be going to spend the weekend with him, and if I step in and say no they are not going then i receive more abuse. I sometimes think I am still walking the victim shoes so that others do not notice I am still suffering.

  5. mine is a street angel (everybody loves him) and a house devil (not sure i do anymore). manipulative liar around “his” family. my family live far away.
    he would deny he has a problem while trying to make my mistakes seem like deadly sins. the children’s problems are all my fault. really? where was he? oh, that’s right, NOT HERE! starting to see this is not ALL MY FAULT. BULLSHIT! wish me luck for the holidays. they make it all worse.

    1. Judith, be very careful over the holidays. This time of year with all the presents, visits, and upcoming tax returns can spawn violence even if its not occurred before. Keep control of yourself and leave his presence if you must. I wish you luck and peace.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *



Follow Us

Subscribe to Blog

  • advertisement

in Verbal Abuse in Relationships Comments

Mental Health Newsletter

Sign up for the HealthyPlace mental health newsletter for latest news, articles, events.

Mental Health
Newsletter Subscribe Now!

Mental Health Newsletter

Sign up for the HealthyPlace mental health newsletter for latest news, articles, events.

Log in

Login to your account

Username *
Password *
Remember Me