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Our Mental Health Blogs

Make Room to Cure Anxiety

Make Room to Cure Anxiety

What does anxiety management mean to you?

Make time for the things that don’t have a space in your life, yet.

  • How often are you able to feel calm, well-rested, comfortable?
  • What can you change to make those things a part of your everyday existence?
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Lack of a Cure for Psychiatric Illness is Discouraging for Families

Lack of a Cure for Psychiatric Illness is Discouraging for Families

There’s no cure for crazy. Sometimes I forget.

My husband pointed it out to me once. “When he does well, you get your hopes up,” he said. “And I think you let yourself have expectations that aren’t realistic. It’s almost like you still think someday he’ll be cured.”

He was right, of course, but that did nothing to soften the blow.

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Dissociative Identity Disorder Disclosure: DOs and DON’Ts

Dissociative Identity Disorder Disclosure: DOs and DON’Ts

Disclosing dissociative identity disorder, DID, is a big decision. Here are some important things to consider, some dos and don'ts for DID disclosure.

The decision to disclose your dissociative identity disorder (DID) is a deeply personal one. Many, perhaps most, people with DID live in near silence about their disorder. They may tell only their family or no one at all. Some choose to share their dissociative identity disorder diagnosis not just with family but also friends. I belong to a smaller group of people who publicly say, “I have DID.” What’s comfortable for you may be unhealthy for someone else, and vice versa. With that in mind, what I offer you today isn’t advice on whether or not to reveal your DID diagnosis, but a short list of DOs and DON’Ts – things to keep in mind when considering disclosure.

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Why Anxious People Hate Platitudes

Why Anxious People Hate Platitudes

Anxious people hate platitudes because they remind us that you don't have a clue about what we go through. Pretty phrases won't fix the chemicals in my brain.

You say, “Don’t worry, be happy.” Oh! So that’s totally how this anxiety thing works: I just won’t worry. Why didn’t I think of that before?! Next time my throat closes up and I can’t leave the house, it won’t be a problem… In my spare time I’ll skydive, shoe shop and rave.

Oh wait, I’m not Lindsay Lohan. And I’m afraid of heights, crowds and loud noises. Now I remember why I hate platitudes. They don’t work.

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Walking on Eggshells Around A Person With Bipolar Disorder

Walking on Eggshells Around A Person With Bipolar Disorder

Recently I was contacted by someone (let’s call her Ms. X) who wanted to end a friendship with a bipolar person and asked me how to do it with the least harm possible. I talked with Ms. X and it appears that her bipolar friend had been doing some very hurtful things. I asked Ms. X if she had talked to her friend about these things. Ms. X said that no, she hadn’t.

So why is terminating a friendship preferable to talking about the problem?

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DID, Identity Alteration, and The Lonely Illusion of Intimacy

DID, Identity Alteration, and The Lonely Illusion of Intimacy

Living with Dissociative Identity Disorder is, among other things, lonely. I often feel like I’m watching my life as it’s lived by braver or more competent others. A situation presents itself and, without conscious choice, the deck that is my system of alters begins to shuffle. Some force outside my control determines, almost instantaneously, the card best suited for the circumstances; and the card plays until the shuffling begins again. On one hand, this identity alteration is precisely what has allowed me to find employment, make friends, and parent a child. On the other, it’s what separates me from the world and makes intimacy an illusion that only rarely becomes my reality.

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Sibling Rivalry and the Mentally Ill Child

Sibling Rivalry and the Mentally Ill Child

“Mom always liked you best!”

Tommy Smothers made the lament famous; every sibling has likely heard it. But for those with mentally ill siblings—could there be some truth to it?

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Five Characteristics to Avoid in a Partner

When looking for a partner we often bring a list of requirements or “wants” such as: must be faithful, must have stable employment, or must love dogs. Once you’ve found someone who catches your attention and meets your list of requirements, you begin the first wonderful lovey-dovey stage in a romantic relationship where you can’t get enough of each other and where your partner can do no wrong. It’s only when the love dust settles that you begin to see clearly and notice some of the more undesirable characteristics in him.

Five Characteristics to Avoid in a Partner

When looking for a partner we often bring a list of requirements or “wants” such as: must be faithful, must have stable employment, or must love dogs. Once you’ve found someone who catches your attention and meets your list of requirements, you begin the first wonderful lovey-dovey stage in a romantic relationship where you can’t get enough of each other and where your partner can do no wrong. It’s only when the love dust settles that you begin to see clearly and notice some of the more undesirable characteristics in him.

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Video: Adult ADHD Means That I’m Hyperfocused AND Forgetful

In my final video for HealthyPlace, I give definitive proof that I have ADHD and that hyper-focus can be an embarrassing thing.

Video: Adult ADHD Means That I’m Hyperfocused AND Forgetful

So there I was, relieved that I had written my final blog entry without incident. I even still liked it after waking up. But something was bugging me. I felt like I had left something out. Towards the end of the day I was still puzzled. Why did I feel like things were unfinished?

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How to Deal With Comorbid Anxiety and Depression

How to Deal With Comorbid Anxiety and Depression

Dealing with comorbid anxiety and depression can make you feel exhausted. Here's a CBT way to help you manage comorbid anxiety and depression. Check it out.

Anxiety and depression often go together. It’s called comorbidity (Relationship Between Depression and Anxiety). Not only does suffering from the one make it more likely you’ll have to deal with the other at some point, it also means that, baseline, emotions are more of a challenge. Comorbid anxiety and depression bounce your emotions around, making you feel hopeless and scared at the same time.

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