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Our Mental Health Blogs

Using Cognitive Behavioral Therapy or CBT to Treat Anxiety

Using Cognitive Behavioral Therapy or CBT to Treat Anxiety

Using cognitive behavioral therapy, or CBT, to treat anxiety is a scientifically valid treatment method. Try CBT to treat your anxiety at home with these tips.Evidence shows that using cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) to treat anxiety works. Cognitive behavioral therapy focuses on replacing maladaptive thoughts and behaviors with positive, healthy ones. Patients are taught to recognize, question, and refute negative behaviors and thought patterns, and then to replace them with more adaptive versions. By learning to do this, we engage in new ways of thinking and acting. Using CBT to treat anxiety helps us more effectively manage our anxiety symptoms. 

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What to Do When Anxiety Behaves Like a Mood Disorder

What to Do When Anxiety Behaves Like a Mood Disorder

Learn what it's like when anxiety behaves like a mood disorder, specifically bipolar disorder. Read tips to manage anxiety when it acts like a mood disorder.

Anxiety disorders and mood disorders are two separate experiences. While both involve thoughts, feelings, and actions that are disruptive to life and disproportionate to circumstances, they have different symptoms (they do often occur together, though). Because these are different disorders, anxiety disorders and mood disorders often have different treatment approaches. What should you do, then, when your anxiety behaves like a mood disorder?

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Introduction to Kristen Schou, Author of ‘Speaking Out About Self-Injury’

Introduction to Kristen Schou, Author of ‘Speaking Out About Self-Injury’

Kristen Schou shares about her self-injury past and her self-harm recovery. Read more about Kristen Schou and "Speaking Out About Self-Injury" blog here.My name is Kristen Schou and I am delighted to join the Speaking Out About Self-Injury blog on HealthyPlace. I am so excited to have a platform to share my experiences with self-injury and give advice to help others. Self-injury is a condition that is very stigmatized which causes people not to reach out for the help that they need. My goal for this blog is to help others who are going through the same thing that I went through.

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Others Have It Worse Than You and Bipolar Doesn’t Care

Others Have It Worse Than You and Bipolar Doesn’t Care

If you have bipolar disorder, you might hear "others have it worse than you." This is an unfair statement about bipolar disorder, read why.People often say to those suffering with bipolar disorder, “Others have it worse than you.” This is not a helpful statement. We know that others have it worse than us. In fact, others with bipolar have it worse than us; that’s just math. But the fact that others have it worse than us is absolutely irrelevant to our suffering with bipolar.

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Numbing Out: What If I Said You Weren’t Addicted to Food?

Numbing Out: What If I Said You Weren’t Addicted to Food?

Numbing out helps you cope with tough feelings, but it can also be a lie behind an eating disorder. Learn options to numbing out in eating disorder recovery.What if numbing out pain with food is an unhealthy solution, not an addiction? What if I told you that you weren’t addicted to food? What if I told you that you didn’t have a problem with food at all? What if I told you that the problem was the discomfort beneath your skin, that urge to squirm and itch and run. The discomfort under your skin is what you’ve been trying to numb out. The food is just the solution you’ve come up with.

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Small Injury Leads to Prescription Pain Medication Addiction

Small Injury Leads to Prescription Pain Medication Addiction

Prescription pain medication addiction is more common than you think. Read one man's story of how he became addicted to pain medications prescribed to him.Prescription pain medication addiction can happen more quickly than you can imagine. Here is my story of being addicted to pain medication.

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Celebrity Suicides Affect Us More Than We Realize

Celebrity Suicides Affect Us More Than We Realize

Celebrity suicides hit us harder than we think they do. Around 9:00 p.m. on July 20th, I logged onto Facebook and saw status updates about celebrity suicide with the words “Linkin Park”, “suicide”, and “RIP, Chester.” Suddenly, my body froze. The dark lyrics from Linkin Park’s most popular songs flooded my head. Celebrity suicides affect us more than you might think.

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Introduction to Megan Rahm, Author of ‘Recovering from Mental Illness’

Introduction to Megan Rahm, Author of ‘Recovering from Mental Illness’

Megan Rahm, new author of "Recovering from Mental Illness" shares her experience with bulimia and schizoaffective disorder and recovering from mental illness.I’m Megan Rahm and I’m a new co-author for the blog Recovering from Mental Illness. I live in Toledo, Ohio with my husband and 14-month-old daughter. I have struggled with mental health symptoms most of my life, and in my early 20s I was diagnosed with bulimia and schizoaffective disorder.

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Introduction to Misti Kuykendall, Author of ‘Debunking Addiction’

Introduction to Misti Kuykendall, Author of ‘Debunking Addiction’

Misti Kuykendall, new author of "Debunking Addiction," talks about her addictions to alcohol and meth and how she wants to help other addicts. My name is Misti Kuykendall and I’m a new author on Debunking Addiction. I am a recovered alcoholic and methamphetamine (meth) addict. At the early age of 13, I was diagnosed with bipolar disorder. For more than a decade, I used alcohol to ease my symptoms of mania and meth to ease depressive symptoms.

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You Don’t Look Like Someone with a Mental Illness

You Don’t Look Like Someone with a Mental Illness

Mental illness looks like normal emotion, so you can't see it by looking. If we ignore the different ways mental illness looks, we risk too much. Learn more.

People’s notions of what someone with a mental illness looks like includes ideas of how they think a person with mental illness should behave. The idea that you can tell someone with a mental illness by looking at them comes from both misunderstanding and stigma. But, as more and more people discuss realities like high-functioning mental illness and so forth, people are beginning to broaden their understanding. However, we need to delve deeper into the idea that someone can look like they have a mental illness. The fact is, mental illness looks different in everyone, and I don’t mean simply from one illness to another, but within the same illness.

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