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Our Mental Health Blogs

How Do You Know If You Are an Alcoholic?

How Do You Know If You Are an Alcoholic?

Only you can decide if you are an alcoholic, but here are some questions to ask yourself that will help you understand if you have a problem with alcohol.

How do you know if you are an alcoholic? What makes a person an alcoholic? Perhaps you’re wondering because the start of a new year often brings reflection on the past as well as hope for the future. It can prompt a person to make resolutions to be healthier, and that may be motivation to look at whether he or she is an alcoholic. Addiction to alcohol, or alcoholism, is not a one-size-fits-all disease. There isn’t a blood test for it, it doesn’t consist of a specific number of drinks per day, nor can someone decide that you are an alcoholic for you. Whether or not you are an alcoholic depends on a number of conditions, the biggest being the effect that alcohol has on your life.

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Is There a Reason for Hearing Voices Twice this Week?

Is There a Reason for Hearing Voices Twice this Week?

The reason for hearing voices more than usual this week must have to do with heightened anxiety. But sometimes I'm anxious and don't hear voices. What's up?

Usually, I can figure out the reason for hearing voices. I hear schizoaffective voices a lot. This week, I heard them two days in a row. That’s never happened before. But I think I know why my schizoaffective disorder made me hear voices two days in a row.

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Why Weekend Depression Strikes and What to Do About It

Why Weekend Depression Strikes and What to Do About It

Weekend depression interrupts our down-time and makes us feel more depressed than during the week. Learn why weekend depression happens and what to do about it.

Weekend depression turns out to be real. I noticed a few years back that while the rest of the world seems to live for the weekends, when I was depressed, the weekends would often make me feel even more depressed. I’ve discovered some reasons for weekend depression and what we can do to feel better.

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18 Ways to Reduce Anxiety This Year

18 Ways to Reduce Anxiety This Year

Need ways to reduce anxiety? Check this list of 18 ways to reduce anxiety for useful tools that help lower anxiety in the new year and beyond. Take a look.

This is your year to find ways to reduce anxiety. Most likely, you’ve been working on doing so already, which means you have a head start. You may have already experienced successes, and you can build on that momentum this year. You might also have experienced setbacks and difficulties getting rid of worries, fears, social anxiety, racing or obsessive thoughts, and the myriad effects and symptoms of anxiety. This is why it’s important to celebrate a new year. A new year is symbolic of a fresh start. You can learn new ways to reduce anxiety in 2018.

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How to Boost Your Self-Esteem When You Have Depression

How to Boost Your Self-Esteem When You Have Depression

Knowing how to boost your self-esteem when you have depression can save you from a downward spiral. Discover how to boost your self-esteem even with depression.

Depression and low self-esteem can be closely connected, and boosting your self-esteem when they both appear can be difficult. When you live with low self-esteem for a long time, you may come to believe that you are inherently worthless, and this deep sense of worthlessness is a common symptom of depression. Conversely, if you’ve lived with depression for a long time, your self-esteem can be impacted. Perhaps when the motivation and energy are drained out of you, you lose confidence in your abilities and value. Boosting your self-esteem then can be particularly challenging.

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How to Care for Someone with PTSD

How to Care for Someone with PTSD

Learning how to care for someone with PTSD can be confusing. Here are some tips on how to care for someone with PTSD through her ups and downs. Learn more here.

Learning how to care for someone with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can be hard. As someone who has served as both a caretaker of someone with PTSD and a person in need of care, I intimately understand the difficulties interlaced in the care of people with trauma histories. For example, it can be hard for us to express joy and gratitude, even when we feel it. People with PTSD can be prone to anger, which may make us lash out verbally or even physically (though studies have shown that PTSD does not usually make people more violent than the general population). PTSD can be treatment resistant, meaning we feel so damaged, hopeless, or otherwise unworthy that we give up on getting better, or refuse to try in the first place. People with PTSD are sometimes drawn toward self-harming behaviors like cutting ourselves or misusing drugs. It is indescribably painful to sit and hold the hand of someone you care for when that someone doesn’t appear to care about herself. But PTSD recovery relies on community support. Learning how to care for someone with PTSD means learning to keep holding our hands, even if we can’t find the words to tell you how much it means to us.

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What Makes Recovery from Mental Illness Possible?

What Makes Recovery from Mental Illness Possible?

Recovery from mental illness is possible any day of the year. Recovery is a recurring decision to make every day--not just a New Year's resolution that fizzles.Recovery from mental illness is possible, but it can be surprisingly more difficult than expected. Many may believe that the new year is an ideal time to recover from mental illness as it can be a time of reflection, goal setting, excitement and new beginnings, but it can also be a time of pressure to change, share what is going to be new and believe things you may not necessarily agree with. We hear, “What is your New Year’s resolution?” hundreds of times during the months of December and January and we may think it is going to motivate us to overcome our mental illness. But a time of year doesn’t determine if recovery from a mental illness is possible, a decision does.

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Permission for the Day Off Work Because of Bipolar

Permission for the Day Off Work Because of Bipolar

Taking the day off work because of bipolar disorder is something we need to do sometimes, but can we actually give ourselves permission for the day off work?I hate taking days off work and I most especially hate taking days off work because of bipolar disorder. This is because I’m a perfectionist and overachiever and workaholic — oh, and I need the money. So it’s really hard for me to fight these personality characteristics (and the money thing) and give myself permission for the day off work because of bipolar disorder.

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My Mental Health Goals for This Year

My Mental Health Goals for This Year

My mental health goals for this year include dealing with motivation and abandonment. I think therapy can help me meet my mental health goals. What about you?

I’m setting mental health goals because nothing is better than getting a fresh start and feeling confident about the new year. I love watching everyone push to find new resolutions that they’re excited about. My mental health goals this year are to gain more self-control, work on overcoming paranoia in my relationship and get into therapy.

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How We Ask About a Person’s Mental Illness Matters

How We Ask About a Person’s Mental Illness Matters

How you ask about a person's mental illness matters to them. Your words can raise awareness and reduce stigma and self-stigma around mental illness. Learn more.

How we ask about a person’s mental illness matters because language can stigmatize mental illness. At the core of stigmatizing mental health conversations, is the idea that mental illnesses are not real, legitimate illnesses. It’s one of the basics when talking about mental illness, and to some degree, it seems like we should be well past this statement by now. But we’re not. It’s not just naysayers of mental illness that make the mistake, either; in some cases, even those who have mental illness or know someone who does still don’t know what to say to someone with a mental illness. They seem to want to think of mental illness as something other than a sickness and end up contributing to stigma in the questions they ask about a person’s mental illness.

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