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Our Mental Health Blogs

Binge Eating Disorder Recovery and Dating

Binge Eating Disorder Recovery and Dating

During eating disorder recovery, dating can be difficult to navigate. Here I share what I've found necessary for a healthy relationship during recovery.
Since being in eating disorder recovery and feeling well enough to start dating again, I have found that the dating scene can be difficult to navigate. Finding someone who understands what you are going/have gone through may seem like an impossible task. Here are some tips on getting back out there once you feel ready to date again in eating disorder recovery.

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How a Mental Health Community Reduces Stigma’s Impact

How a Mental Health Community Reduces Stigma’s Impact

Being a part of a mental health community can help reduce isolation associated with mental illness. Plus, mental health communities soften the impact of stigma.

Many xon’t know this, but a mental health community can reduce the impact of stigma. One thing that mental illness is really good at is making a person feel isolated and alone, which is a perfect way for stigma and self-stigma to thrive. There are a number of ways to combat that, such as reading more about the illness to learn the facts versus the fiction. But another way to effectively combat whatever sort of stigma comes along is to immerse oneself in a mental health community to reduce the impact of stigma and connect with others who have similar experiences.

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Use Physical Fitness to Fight Mental Health Stigma

Use Physical Fitness to Fight Mental Health Stigma

Physical fitness fights mental health stigma - and self-stigma - on many levels. Read this to find out why you should and how you can fight stigma with fitness.

There are many ways that fitness can help you fight mental health stigma. One of the ways people form stigmatizing beliefs about those with mental health issues is that they think they are lazy for not working or engaging in society. Mental health stigma makes people believe these myths, but myths can be busted by more individuals who have a mental illness getting healthy exercise and improving their fitness levels.

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You Can Let Yourself Be Anxious (Why It’s OK)

You Can Let Yourself Be Anxious (Why It’s OK)

You can let yourself be anxious even though your goal is to reduce anxiety. Here are several reasons why allowing yourself to be anxious is mentally healthy.

It’s truly okay to let yourself be anxious. Why? Because sometimes we all just need to allow ourselves to feel how we feel, to be okay with anxious thoughts (Letting Someone with Mental Illness Be Upset). It’s even okay to express those anxious feelings. The key is how much we let ourselves be anxious. 

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Use Distress Tolerance Skills for Dissociation in DID

Use Distress Tolerance Skills for Dissociation in DID

Distress tolerance skills can be especially useful in decreasing symptoms of dissociative identity disorder (DID). Learn how distress tolerance skills help you.

While dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) isn’t the primary treatment option for dissociative identity disorder (DID), there are DBT skills, like distress tolerance skills, that can help people manage their dissociation symptoms. These skills come in handy in a crisis or when we feel ourselves heading towards dissociation. So how do you use the distress tolerance skills of DBT for the dissociation of DID?

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My Schizoaffective Disorder Is Not My Fault

My Schizoaffective Disorder Is Not My Fault

Having schizoaffective disorder isn't my fault, so why do I blame myself for it? Here are insights to the blame game I play with myself due to self-stigma.I blame myself for my schizoaffective disorder, in reality, I know my schizoaffective disorder is not my fault. I know blaming myself doesn’t make sense—especially since I live to fight mental illness stigma (Schizophrenia, Schizoaffective Disorder, and Self-Stigma). It doesn’t make sense for a lot of other reasons as well. Here’s why my schizoaffective disorder is not my fault–and why I blame myself for it anyway.

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Live Life Now: Living in the Present Moment

Live Life Now: Living in the Present Moment

Live life now, not as it was and not as it might be. Being fully present in this moment is important to finding your bliss. Here are some ways to live life now.
We all need to learn to live life now. Spending all of our mental energy focused on the past or the future means that we aren’t living in the present. We aren’t living our lives right now, and, honestly, the present moment is truly the only time we have to live. Many of us are constantly distracted, but I’d encourage each of us to live life now and be fully present in this moment.

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Social Anxiety, Dread of Meeting New People

Social Anxiety, Dread of Meeting New People

People experiencing social anxiety can feel dread when meeting new people. Learn three tips for lowering social anxiety and dread so you can meet new people.

When it comes to meeting new people, social anxiety instills in its sufferers a sense of dread. Having to meet new people can sound alarms and ignite warning fires in the minds and bodies of those living with social anxiety (Extroverts Can Experience Social Anxiety, Too). In response to the fires, fire walls within the brain pop up, sealing off areas like rational thought and peaceful feelings so that all attention is funneled to the fire. The fire is a signal of danger—of stranger danger—and it makes us dread meeting new people. What we often don’t realize is that we are in charge of the alarm, the fire, even social anxiety itself. You don’t have to forever dread meeting new people. 

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Small Achievements to Celebrate in Bipolar Disorder

Small Achievements to Celebrate in Bipolar Disorder

Small achievements in bipolar disorder are important to celebrate. Don't let the little wins pass by -- use them to encourage future achievements.

It’s important to celebrate the small achievements in bipolar disorder. I have written about this before, in fact. But what does a small win in bipolar disorder look like? How do you celebrate a small achievement in bipolar disorder?

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‘Adulting’ with Schizophrenia or Schizoaffective Disorder

‘Adulting’ with Schizophrenia or Schizoaffective Disorder

'Adulting' can be hard with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. But many schizophrenic adults thrive, and many of the mentally healthy do not. Do you?“Adulting” can be hard enough without schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. When you have a mental illness, even seemingly simple things like keeping the apartment clean add up to be monumental tasks (Guilt, Shame, and Responsibility in Mental Illness). Here’s how my schizophrenic and schizoaffective symptoms get in the way of adult obligations, even though I keep tackling them head on.

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