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Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Sleep Deprivation

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Sleep Deprivation

Sleep deprivation is a common complaint among people who experience posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Learn how to recognize and manage sleep deprivation.

Sleep deprivation is a common complaint among people who experience posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Research shows that at least 50% of individuals with PTSD have experienced recurring nightmares, and the majority of people with PTSD report either difficulty falling asleep(sleep onset insomnia), or trouble staying asleep long enough to feel rested (maintenance insomnia). Even though sleep difficulties often accompany PTSD, their importance might be underrepresented. Knowing how to recognize the signs of sleep deprivation and how to manage them is a useful tool in treating the symptoms of PTSD.

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Effects of PTSD on Relationships If Both Partners Have PTSD

Effects of PTSD on Relationships If Both Partners Have PTSD

The effects of PTSD on relationships in which one partner suffers are hard to deal with, but when both partners have PTSD, the relationship can be tricky.

The effects of PTSD on relationships when both partners have PTSD create both problems and benefits. Living in the aftermath of trauma is difficult enough on its own, but navigating a relationship in which both partners have PTSD can be an emotional minefield. Fortunately, learning how to be in a relationship with someone who has PTSD is easier to understand when you live with PTSD too.

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What Does Depersonalization with PTSD Feel Like?

What Does Depersonalization with PTSD Feel Like?

Depersonalization is a possible symptom of PTSD that makes you feel disconnected from your thoughts, emotions, body and/or others. Discover more about it here.

Depersonalization is one of the potential dissociative symptoms experienced by a person with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Individuals frequently describe depersonalization as repeated instances of feeling a disconnect between one’s thoughts and physical self. Some also describe it as watching the world through a dreamlike state or watching events from outside one’s body. It is one of the most challenging to define sensations I have ever experienced. Following are some examples of depersonalization symptoms in PTSD and how I experienced them.

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Setting Goals for PTSD Recovery Success

Setting Goals for PTSD Recovery Success

Setting goals for PTSD recovery can be slowed by unrealistic expectations and the resulting frustrations. Learn a way to set realistic goals for your recovery.

Setting goals for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) recovery can be difficult, in part because PTSD impacts every aspect of daily living, every day. When seeking help for recovery, it is understandable to want to feel better as quickly as possible in order to put the worst behind you and move on. Sometimes it can be difficult to notice what progress is being made when you are still experiencing the symptoms of PTSD daily. This is where understanding your PTSD diagnosis as well as any coexisting conditions and setting goals for PTSD recovery can help you feel successful.

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Does Having PTSD Make You Violent?

Does Having PTSD Make You Violent?

PTSD is often mischaracterized as a violent disorder. But does having PTSD make you violent? Learn more about PTSD and and violent behavior before you judge.

Does having posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) make you violent? I haven’t seen the Las Vegas shooter accused of having posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but past perpetrators of mass shootings have been speculated to have PTSD. Is it true? Does having PTSD make people more violent or prone to committing acts of extreme violence?

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How to Appreciate Success, Even When It’s Scary

How to Appreciate Success, Even When It’s Scary

Success is wonderful, but for those of us with posttraumatic stress disorder, it can also be terrifying. Learn how to appreciate success while living with PTSD.

Do you appreciate your successes, or does pausing to appreciate success scare you? Even though success is a very normal aspiration, feeling happy about a success (or feeling happy for any reason) can be scary for trauma survivors. The definition of success varies greatly between individuals and can even change during different stages of the same person’s life. However, for those of us living with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the experience of success is sometimes a little extra complicated, even scary. I’m slowly learning to appreciate success in my life with PTSD.

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Can I Be Traumatized Again If I Have PTSD?

Can I Be Traumatized Again If I Have PTSD?

You can be traumatized again after experiencing a PTSD-causing trauma. Here's how it works and how you can lessen the effects of being traumatized again.

What happens when someone with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is traumatized again? It’s a question that has been on my mind a lot lately. So many scary and potentially traumatic or anxiety-provoking natural phenomena are taking place in the world right now. Whether we’re talking the hurricanes in the Southern United States, the West Coast wildfires that caused ash to rain over my city for a day and a half, or the fatal floods in Southeast Asia, the world has watched a lot of unpredictable events unfold. Statistically speaking, some of the people affected by these natural disasters must already have PTSD.1 Are those people with PTSD being traumatized again?

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Why Can Childhood Sexual Abuse Lead to Promiscuity?

Why Can Childhood Sexual Abuse Lead to Promiscuity?

Survivors of childhood sexual abuse may try to cope with PTSD symptoms by engaging in sexual promiscuity. Here is how one survivor explains why this happens.

At first, the idea that sexual promiscuity can result from childhood sexual abuse seems illogical. Wouldn’t someone who suffered sexual abuse have difficulty creating intimate relationships and work to avoid personal contact? While this can often be the case, a review of the research on childhood sexual abuse (from the American Academy of Experts in Traumatic Stress, or AAETS) confirms that a large number of survivors engage in promiscuous behaviors, even those who turn away close relationships. Here are some of the reasons why childhood sexual abuse can lead to promiscuity.

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Negative Self-Talk Gets in the Way of Finding Help for PTSD

Negative Self-Talk Gets in the Way of Finding Help for PTSD

Negative-self talk can keep people with untreated PTSD from realizing they deserve help. Here's why negative self-talk shouldn't keep you from PTSD help.I have experienced a lot of negative self-talk around my posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Before my PTSD diagnosis and therapy, my daily life was filled with stress and feelings of worthlessness. I had lived with my anxieties, depression, and dissociation for most of my life. I had no frame of reference for what life could be like without these symptoms. I had to reach a point where I was unable to do anything but sit on the couch and obsess over imagined diseases and an untimely death before I sought out a professional. Even then, I had a difficult time allowing myself to heal as if I wasn’t significant enough for help. Here are some things I wish I had known about negative self-talk and PTSD when I first began reaching out for assistance.

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Retrieving Memories Lost to Dissociation Caused by Trauma

Retrieving Memories Lost to Dissociation Caused by Trauma

Memories lost to dissociation can be of moments or cover long time spans, and can be both good and bad. Here's one way to regain memories lost to dissociation.My memories lost to dissociation come from having experienced prolonged traumatic abuses as a child. I developed the protective reflex of dissociation at an early age. Dissociation was my response to frightening, harmful, and unpredictable environments. I learned to tune out and shut down mentally while still being able to respond to my surroundings to function in the moment. I don’t know this because I remember it. I know this because other people hold memories for me. Here is how I began reclaiming my memories lost to trauma-related dissociation.

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