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Our Mental Health Blogs

Mental Fog, Stress, and PTSD

Mental Fog, Stress, and PTSD

Mental fog is a symptom of PTSD that can make people feel uncertain and confused. What causes mental fog? What can you do for it? Learn more about it here.

Do you ever feel like you’re in a mental fog, or you can’t think straight? As though you have to labor to access even the simplest thoughts? I feel this way often, and it used to make me panic, like I was losing my mental faculties. Then I realized that “mental fog” (not a clinical term) or confusion can actually result from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Triggers, stress, and anxiety can heighten feelings of mental fog–leaving those of us with PTSD feeling even more vulnerable and confused during the very moments when we most need to feel safe and in control.

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Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Psychosis

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Psychosis

Posttraumatic stress disorder and psychosis can collide. Learn how to tell apart typical PTSD symptoms from the rarer symptoms of PTSD associated psychosis.

Posttraumatic stress disorder and psychosis? What do you think of when you hear the term “psychosis?” Most people know that it is a serious mental illness symptom that involves a radical disconnection from objective reality. Not everyone knows, however, that sometimes having posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can lead to psychosis.

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PTSD and Short-Term Memory Loss

PTSD and Short-Term Memory Loss

PTSD impacts short-term memory for specific reasons. Learn why PTSD causes short-term memory problems, how to deal with it and how to know if it gets serious.

For many individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), short-term memory loss is a significant concern. While working to calm and organize memories of trauma, individuals with PTSD may also struggle to recall simple, everyday information. Short-term memory loss can leave an individual with PTSD with concerns over deteriorating cognitive functioning, and uncertainty about just how much forgetfulness is reasonable and how much becomes a medical concern.

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When PTSD and Intimacy Collide: What Really Happens?

When PTSD and Intimacy Collide: What Really Happens?

PTSD and intimacy issues can impact both new and long-term relationships. How does PTSD affect intimacy? What do partners need to watch for? Learn here.

Difficulties with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and intimacy are common, regardless of the nature of the trauma leading to PTSD. A quick search of the Internet will return dozens of links to websites regarding PTSD and intimacy and the challenges PTSD presents in maintaining intimate relationships. There is a flood of information regarding trust issues, poor communication, closeness, violence, sexual dysfunction, and more. However, in my case, all the facts and statistics do is cause my eyes to glaze over without really getting to the point. In an intimate relationship, partners usually come to understand each other’s behaviors. What really happens in a relationship when PTSD and intimacy collide?

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Stress from Positive Change Requires Self-Care for PTSD Too

Stress from Positive Change Requires Self-Care for PTSD Too

Positive changes create stress too. If you're in PTSD recovery, identifying positive stress vs negative stress is important to your mental health. Learn more.Understanding how stress from positive change adds to our stress load improves our self-care and helps us stay on the path to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) recovery. While the word “stress” applies to life-altering situations like traumatic or stressful events as often as it pertains to a long to-do list, it is not typically associated with times when things are good. However, positive change and stress do exist together and it helps people with PTSD to recognize them when they occur.

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Sleep Deprivation with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Sleep Deprivation with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Sleep deprivation is a common complaint among people who experience posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Learn how to recognize and manage sleep deprivation.

Sleep deprivation is a common complaint among people who experience posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Research shows that at least 50% of individuals with PTSD have experienced recurring nightmares, and the majority of people with PTSD report either difficulty falling asleep (sleep onset insomnia), or trouble staying asleep long enough to feel rested (maintenance insomnia). Even though sleep difficulties often accompany PTSD, their importance might be underrepresented. Knowing how to recognize the symptoms of sleep deprivation and how to manage them are useful tools in treating the symptoms of PTSD.

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Effects of PTSD on Relationships If Both Partners Have PTSD

Effects of PTSD on Relationships If Both Partners Have PTSD

The effects of PTSD on relationships in which one partner suffers are hard to deal with, but when both partners have PTSD, the relationship can be tricky.

The effects of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on relationships when both partners have PTSD create both problems and benefits. Living in the aftermath of trauma is difficult enough on its own, but navigating a relationship in which both partners have PTSD can be an emotional minefield. Fortunately, learning how to be in a relationship with someone who has PTSD is easier to understand when you live with PTSD too.

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What Does Depersonalization with PTSD Feel Like?

What Does Depersonalization with PTSD Feel Like?

Depersonalization is a possible symptom of PTSD that makes you feel disconnected from your thoughts, emotions, body and/or others. Discover more about it here.

Depersonalization is one of the potential dissociative symptoms experienced by a person with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Individuals frequently describe depersonalization as repeated instances of feeling a disconnect between one’s thoughts and physical self. Some also describe it as watching the world through a dreamlike state or watching events from outside one’s body. It is one of the most challenging to define sensations I have ever experienced. Following are some examples of depersonalization symptoms in PTSD and how I experienced them.

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Setting Goals for PTSD Recovery Success

Setting Goals for PTSD Recovery Success

Setting goals for PTSD recovery can be slowed by unrealistic expectations and the resulting frustrations. Learn a way to set realistic goals for your recovery.

Setting goals for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) recovery can be difficult, in part because PTSD impacts every aspect of daily living, every day. When seeking help for recovery, it is understandable to want to feel better as quickly as possible in order to put the worst behind you and move on. Sometimes it can be difficult to notice what progress is being made when you are still experiencing the symptoms of PTSD daily. This is where understanding your PTSD diagnosis as well as any coexisting conditions and setting goals for PTSD recovery can help you feel successful.

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Does Having PTSD Make You Violent?

Does Having PTSD Make You Violent?

PTSD is often mischaracterized as a violent disorder. But does having PTSD make you violent? Learn more about PTSD and and violent behavior before you judge.

Does having posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) make you violent? I haven’t seen the Las Vegas shooter accused of having posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but past perpetrators of mass shootings have been speculated to have PTSD. Is it true? Does having PTSD make people more violent or prone to committing acts of extreme violence?

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