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Eating Disorder Recovery Tips for the Holidays

Eating Disorder Recovery Tips for the Holidays

Eating disorder recovery tips for the holidays can make the difference between success and relapse. Discover holiday tips for eating disorder recovery here.

We need eating disorder recovery tips for the holidays because, despite its festive spirit and upbeat mood, this can be a stressful time of year. The tension becomes even more palpable for those in recovery from an eating disorder. Between complex family dynamics, hectic scheduling demands and increased financial commitments, this season often feels more nerve-racking than relaxing. But with the added pressure of an eating disorder, one facet tends to cause more anxiety than all the others combined—food. Since the holidays center around cooking, baking and sharing meals, this can present a serious obstacle for those healing their relationship with food. Therefore, it’s crucial to prioritize eating disorder recovery tips for the holidays over these next two months.

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Sexism Fuels Eating Disorders in Women But Feminism Can Help

Sexism Fuels Eating Disorders in Women But Feminism Can Help

Sexism and eating disorders are a cause and product of our culture. Refuting sexism takes the focus off women as body-objects. Feminism helps us do to do that.

Sexism contributes to the prevalence of eating disorders in women, but on the flip side, approaching eating disorders from a feminist outlook can be an important tool for recovery. Our social constructs view gender through a binary lens in which men are the objectifiers and women are the objectified, causing female bodies to be sexualized. This idea makes women feel pressured to meet the conventional standards of beauty, often resorting to extreme behaviors if their physical features are outside the “norm.” But dismantling these restrictive and harmful stereotypes could promote more body acceptance in our culture. Because sexism and eating disorders are connected, a feminist perspective can help to reverse this issue.

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Can Exercise Have a Place in Eating Disorder Recovery?

Can Exercise Have a Place in Eating Disorder Recovery?

Exercise in eating disorder recovery is a delicate issue. Is it possible to find health and balance in exercise without compromising your recovery?

Why wouldn’t exercise have a place in eating disorder recovery? There’s no denying that bodies are designed for movement. In fact, exercise offers health benefits that we need in order to thrive, both physically and mentally. Being active helps us manage stress, boost our moods and feel more energized. It redirects our attention off social media or smartphones, so we can be mindful of how our breathing deepens, muscles contract and bodies function. When used for balance, enjoyment and wellness, exercise is a positive lifestyle choice. But for those of us recovering from eating disorders, exercise could turn into a compulsion.

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Empathy for Yourself and Others in Eating Disorder Recovery

Empathy for Yourself and Others in Eating Disorder Recovery

Eating disorder recovery requires that you show empathy to yourself and others. But remembering how to show empathy may not come easy. Read these tips.

It’s important to show empathy to yourself and others in eating disorder recovery. It’s vital for our loved ones to be able to show empathy for us as we journey towards recovery. It’s also vital to be able to show empathy for ourselves because empathy will help to keep us in eating disorder recovery. Here’s how to show empathy to yourself and others in eating disorder recovery.

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Three Barriers to Eating Disorder Recovery

Three Barriers to Eating Disorder Recovery

There are many barriers to eating disorder recovery, but there are three that wreak havoc. You can conquer barriers to eating disorder recovery. Here's how.There are many barriers to eating disorder recovery, but there are three that particularly wreak havoc. Recovery of any addiction requires us to be brutally honest with ourselves, take responsibility, and hold ourselves accountable. These are all things that an addict of any kind despises (How to Fight Barriers and Get to Your Safe Place). But once we can face the three barriers to eating disorder recovery that stand in our way, the road opens under our feet.

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Numbing Out: What If I Said You Weren’t Addicted to Food?

Numbing Out: What If I Said You Weren’t Addicted to Food?

Numbing out helps you cope with tough feelings, but it can also be a lie behind an eating disorder. Learn options to numbing out in eating disorder recovery.What if numbing out pain with food is an unhealthy solution, not an addiction? What if I told you that you weren’t addicted to food? What if I told you that you didn’t have a problem with food at all? What if I told you that the problem was the discomfort beneath your skin, that urge to squirm and itch and run. The discomfort under your skin is what you’ve been trying to numb out. The food is just the solution you’ve come up with.

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Shame Traps You in an Eating Disorder But You Can Break Free

Shame Traps You in an Eating Disorder But You Can Break Free

Shame traps us in eating disorders by bullying us, creeping into our self-esteem to wreak havoc on our thoughts. Shame traps us, but you can break free.

Shame can keep you trapped in an eating disorder. Shame is insidious, creeping into our self-esteem and wreaking havoc on our thoughts and feelings. Eating disorders come with both shame and guilt, but the difference is important. Shame is the feeling that “I am bad,” while guilt is the feeling that, “I did something bad.” The insidious part about shame is that we begin to see ourselves and the eating disorder as one. When we do this, we become all bad and shame keeps us trapped in the eating disorder. 

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Accepting Eating Disorder Recovery Lessens Your Fears

Accepting Eating Disorder Recovery Lessens Your Fears

Accepting eating disorder recovery helps lessen your fear. Not accepting eating disorder recovery makes recovery a larger, more fearsome process. See why.The benefits of accepting your eating disorder are numerous because it’s the first step to healing. The more we resist something, deny it, or make excuses, it sets up a distance. It’s like holding the eating disorder at arm’s length where it will continue to be a scary thing that’s chaotic to explore. Here are the true benefits of accepting your eating disorder.

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Stop Saying “I Can’t” in Eating Disorder Recovery

Stop Saying “I Can’t” in Eating Disorder Recovery

Stop saying “I can’t” when it comes to eating disorder recovery. “I can’t” is a phrase uttered out loud or in the secret caverns of our minds. I can’t recover. I can’t eat that. I can’t stop exercising. I can’t stop throwing up. I can’t keep food down. I can’t love myself in the mirror. I can’t love the part of my body that I despise. I can’t be kind to myself. Eating disorders are filled with the words “I can’t,” but there’s one ultimate reason to stop saying “I can’t” for the sake of your eating disorder recovery (Why We Believe Eating Disorder Lies). 

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Releasing Anger in Eating Disorder Recovery

Releasing Anger in Eating Disorder Recovery

At some point in your eating disorder recovery, you will need to release anger. Recovery is an interesting process and it can also be tough. When anger comes up, it’s important to know how to handle it so that it doesn’t get stuck in your body and trigger eating disorder patterns (How to Channel Anger Constructively). Take a look at these helpful suggestions to help you release anger as it arises in your eating disorder recovery. 

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