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Our Mental Health Blogs

Orthorexia Nervosa: Restrictive, Obsessive Healthy Eating

Orthorexia Nervosa: Restrictive, Obsessive Healthy Eating

Obsessively healthy eating has a name, it’s orthorexia nervosa. While not clinically recognized in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), orthorexia nervosa–literally fixation on righteous eating–is no less real to those who suffer from it. Recently I interviewed a doctor about this condition and asked her the question many people with it ask–“When did eating right become bad?” The answer–“When it becomes excessive . . . When it interferes with activities of daily living” (Eating Disorder Facts: Who Gets Eating Disorders?). For example, skipping meals because the “right” food isn’t available is not uncommon. Obsessively healthy eating — orthorexia nervosa — can be very unhealthy.

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Publishing a Book on Mental Illness and Addiction

Publishing a Book on Mental Illness and Addiction

This July, I published a book, The Third Sunrise: A Memoir of Madness. It was a long three-year process sprinkled with bouts of depression and anxiety, but happiness as well. I had always wanted to write a book about my experience with mental illness and addiction. The reality of it–exposing my life on paper–was much harder than I had originally thought. I suppose I was a little naïve?

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Mental Illness and Disordered Eating

Mental Illness and Disordered Eating

Last week, I wrote a blog focusing on the connection between mental illness and addiction. I defined “dual diagnosis,” a term focusing on a person living with a mental illness and an alcohol or drug problem. In this post, let’s talk about mental illness and disordered eating.

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Feeling Terminally Unique and Different

Feeling Terminally Unique and Different

Right. Here I go again—another strange phrase that may be construed as useless. I could title this blog “I Am Different.” Or, to push any thoughts of narcissism aside–“We Are Different” might work well. But that doesn’t  work. Not really. Particularly among the masses where people are both similar and dissimilar. First, let’s take a look at the core of the words unique and different. Do they generally mean the same thing?  Let’s check with my coffee stained Thesaurus (I have given up the notion that I will not use it in my posts—no complaints yet.

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