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Our Mental Health Blogs

Separation Anxiety and Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder

Separation Anxiety and Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder

Separation Anxiety and Disruptive Mood Dysregulation DisorderSeparation anxiety in children is an intense fear of being separated from a loved one. It’s considered normal in infants and toddlers. In older kids, it may be a sign of an anxiety disorder. As the parent of a child with disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD), I often find myself wondering if what he experienced in early childhood was separation anxiety or the signs of the emotional disorder to come.

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When to Worry About Temper Tantrums

When to Worry About Temper Tantrums

What signs tell you when to worry about temper tantrums? Most preschoolers have them, but some tantrums are not 'normal.' Visit HealthyPlace to learn when you should worry about your preschooler's moods (hint: now is better than later).

How do we know when to worry about temper tantrums in our children? According to recent research, about 83% of preschoolers have regular temper tantrums.1 If you’re reading this, I’m guessing you are the parent of at least one of the 83 percent. I was one such parent, too, and my son’s tantrums turned out to be the sign of childhood mental illness. How do you know when to worry about temper tantrums because it might be the same for you?

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Managing the Stress of Change for Your Mentally Ill Child

Managing the Stress of Change for Your Mentally Ill Child

The stress of change hits children with mental illness especially hard. How do you help them manage changes? Find answers at HealthyPlace and help your children stress less over changes big and small starting today.The stress of change can be difficult for any child, but for children with emotional and behavioral disorders, the stress of change hits harder. They often can’t predict their own behaviors, thoughts, or feelings, so it makes things worse when they can’t predict their environment either. Life isn’t very predictable, though, so how do we help our children with mental illnesses better manage the stress of change?

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How to Prepare Mentally Ill Children for Natural Disasters

How to Prepare Mentally Ill Children for Natural Disasters

Preparing mentally ill children for natural disasters by giving them a sense of control calms their fear. Here's how to help your children prepare for disaster.

Preparing your mentally ill children for natural disasters is vitally important. Knowing what kinds of natural disasters are expected in your area and preparing a plan to deal with a crisis will provide a sense of control and safety to children with mental illness during a natural disaster.

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Mental Health Benefits of Pets for Children with ADHD, DMDD

Mental Health Benefits of Pets for Children with ADHD, DMDD

The mental health benefits of pets for children usually outweigh the trouble. Pets can teach empathy and help a child's anxiety, attention, and impulse control.

There are mental health benefits of pets for children with mental illness. Pets can be great friends and teachers to children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD), or other mental health concerns. Plenty of research exists backing up the helpfulness of having animals in therapy, school, or at home. My son’s mental health benefits from the animals in his life.

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Holiday Mental Health Plans for Families with Mental Illness

Holiday Mental Health Plans for Families with Mental Illness

Do you have a holiday mental health plan to make the holidays fun for everyone in your family? Try this tip to develop a holiday mental health plan that works.

Maintaining mental health over the holidays can be a real challenge for teens and young adults with mental illness. With 64% of mentally ill people finding holidays stressful, according to a study by the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), it is important to find ways to stay healthy during the holidays. So read on for holiday mental health tips.

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Both Sides of Bullying Affect Children with Mental Illness

Both Sides of Bullying Affect Children with Mental Illness

Both sides of bullying affect children with mental illness. Their behaviors make them a target and, sometimes, make them the bully. So what is a parent to do?

My children start school this week, so I’m back to worrying about both sides of bullying. As a parent of a child with mental illness, who is not going to be mainstreamed this year, the fear is real. Will he be bullied for being “special ed”, or will his behaviors make him the bully? I tell myself that, if I can just get him through adolescence, he’ll be okay. In the meantime, though, how do I manage when I understand that both sides of bullying could affect my child’s school year?

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School Refusal and Your Child With Mental Illness

School Refusal and Your Child With Mental Illness

School refusal happens in families with kids who live with mental illness. School refusal is a nightmare. Learn more about how to handle school refusal.For a child with mental illness, school refusal can be common. School can be anxiety-provoking for children with mental illnesses (School Anxiety in Children: Signs, Causes, Treatments). School refusal is anxiety-provoking for parents. Working parents have the added layer of inflexible timelines. Being late to work daily may get them fired, and the employer doesn’t necessarily care about our struggles with our children. So what can we do as parents to get our mentally ill children past school refusal?

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Staying Mentally Healthy for Your Child with Mental Illness

Staying Mentally Healthy for Your Child with Mental Illness

Staying mentally healthy while parenting a child with mental illness is a struggle. But you need to try. Your child can't make it without you. Staying mentally healthy as a parent of a child with mental illness can be a struggle. It’s difficult to watch your child experience depression, angry outbursts, or suicidal thoughts. Being a parent means having an extraordinary capacity for love, and with that comes an extraordinary capacity for worry. Your child can’t make it without you, though, so it’s important to recognize when you need to reach out for help, too. You need to stay mentally healthy for your child with a mental illness.

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Battling the Isolation of Childhood Mental Illness

Battling the Isolation of Childhood Mental Illness

The isolation caused by childhood mental illness can limit your family's fulfillment and capacity for mental health. Learn to limit associated anxiety instead. A child’s mental illness isolates the whole family. Social anxiety, unpredictable outbursts, sensory issues–all these things can make the outside world exhausting for your child (Mental Illness, Isolation, and Loneliness). Judgment, stigma, and fear make it exhausting for parents. Isolation in childhood mental illness is our biggest enemy. Fight it.

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