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Teetotalers With a Family History of Alcoholism

Teetotalers With a Family History of Alcoholism

Some teetotalers abstain from alcohol because the have a family history of alcoholism. Gillian Jacobs, Hal Sparks, and Joe Biden are a few famous names that attribute their sobriety to teetotaling because of a family history of alcoholism. 

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Benefits of 12-Step Addiction Recovery Programs

Benefits of 12-Step Addiction Recovery Programs

The benefits of 12-step addiction recovery programs is a hotly-debated, emotionally-charged issue. Here's why 12-step recovery programs offer great benefit.

Addiction recovery 12-step programs have many benefits and are widely popular. However, 12-step programs also attract a lot of criticism. For me, the benefits far outweigh any drawbacks.

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H.O.W. Virtues of Recovery from Alcohol Addiction

H.O.W. Virtues of Recovery from Alcohol Addiction

Honesty, open-mindedness, and willingness (H.O.W.) are the virtues essential to my recovery from alcohol addiction. Without any one, relapse becomes a very real possibility. Anyone who relies on these virtues can stay sober. It’s all that separates recovering alcoholics from alcoholics who are still struggling to get sober. Maintaining the H.O.W. virtues allows for recovery from alcohol addiction but using them as tools in sobriety is neither pleasant nor easy, but it is possible. 

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Withdrawal Symptoms From Stimulants, Marijuana, Hallucinogens

Withdrawal Symptoms From Stimulants, Marijuana, Hallucinogens

Withdrawal symptoms from stimulants, marijuana and hallucinogens is not considered directly life-threatening by the medical community. However, the withdrawal symptoms can still be dangerous, as can the behavior associated with the withdrawal symptoms of stimulants, marijuana and hallucinogens. 

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Substance Withdrawal: Alcohol, Opiates and Benzodiazepines

Substance Withdrawal: Alcohol, Opiates and Benzodiazepines

Substance use withdrawal from alcohol, opiates and benzodiazepines is unpleasant and can be dangerous or even fatal, as I wrote about in my last post, Dehumanizing Addicts: A Stigma Leading To Deaths. But different substances produce different kinds of withdrawals and dangers. Here is an overview of withdrawal symptoms for alcohol, opiates, and benzodiazepines (a future post will address more substances).

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Dehumanizing Addicts: A Stigma Leading To Deaths

Dehumanizing Addicts: A Stigma Leading To Deaths

Too often American society dehumanizes and devalues the lives of drug users, particularly drug addicts (Changing Addiction Stigmas to Fight Substance Abuse). Not recognizing and responding to the humanity of drug addicts is a dangerous moral and societal failing.

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New Addiction Recovery Program: Buddhist Recovery Network

New Addiction Recovery Program: Buddhist Recovery Network

Buddhism is more than a religion and spiritual practice — the principles of Buddhism provide tools for an addiction recovery program. Applying the principles of Buddhism to addiction recovery is not necessarily a new or unique idea, but it is less mainstream than typical addiction recovery programs. Maybe this program will resonate with you more so than SMART Recovery, Moderation Management, or 12 step programs.

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How I Got Sober and Clean

How I Got Sober and Clean

I just celebrated a sobriety birthday, an event that always prompts reflection on how I got sober and clean in the first place. I do believe that a power greater than myself, a divine power, is ultimately responsible for me still being alive (Winehouse Death Due to Alcohol Poisoning and Tolerance). That being said, there are some practical components that have been vital to my getting sober and clean and staying that way.

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Alcohol-Induced Behavior: Learning from Bad Choices

Alcohol-Induced Behavior: Learning from Bad Choices

Alcohol is well-known for its disinhibiting effect on people, and many people believe a drunken person’s behavior can quickly change from being a bad choice to alcohol-induced behavior (Short-Term, Long-Term Effects of Alcohol). A video of a Miami doctor raging against an Uber driver over the weekend has gone viral. Dr. Anjali Ramkissoon, suspended from her job due to the video, implores other people to learn from her actions. She has accepted responsibility, acknowledged that she acted inappropriately, and now begs for forgiveness, stating that her behavior was grossly out of character. Dr. Ramkissoon does not, however, seem to acknowledge the role that alcohol may have played in the incident, which appears to be the teachable lesson in this situation (What Is Alcoholism?). Learn how to determine when a person’s behavior goes from simply being a bad choice to alcohol-induced behavior, and what can be done to prevent similar incidents in the future. 

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Common Alcoholism Stereotypes Enable Denial

Common Alcoholism Stereotypes Enable Denial

There are many stereotypes about alcoholics that enable denial that developed through years of misinformation, changing research, and biased opinions. These misconceptions about alcoholism, and the people who suffer from it, are arguably the biggest barrier to individuals seeking help. Alcoholics use stereotypes to justify their drinking habits and explain why they cannot possibly be an alcoholic (Identifying and Diagnosing Alcoholism). If the stereotypes about alcoholics were debunked and known to be attributes not exclusive to alcoholics, these excuses would be harder to find. Without stereotypes about alcoholics, it would be harder to enable denial. 

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