• advertisement

Our Mental Health Blogs

Stop the Anxious Running Commentary in Your Head

Stop the Anxious Running Commentary in Your Head

A non-stop anxious running commentary in your head makes you feel overly worried or afraid. Learn to quiet the anxious running commentary through understanding.Anxiety jabbers incessantly, creating maddening and anxious running commentary in our heads. To make it worse, anxiety acts as a translator and interprets what we hear and see, twisting things into its own warped ideas. With anxiety translating messages we receive, we often misinterpret the world around us. Anxiety’s untrustworthy thoughts lead to self-doubt, faulty reasoning, negative beliefs, overthinking, and overanalyzing. Becoming aware of how the anxious voice in your head translates our incoming messages is an important step in correcting the translations and quieting the anxious running commentary that interrupts your inner speech.

Continue reading

When Performance Anxiety Steals the Show

When Performance Anxiety Steals the Show

Performance anxiety is stealing my dream of being a professional singer. I studied singing in college, but performance anxiety wreaked havoc on any performance.

Performance anxiety may prevent me from living my dream of singing professionally. Since junior high school, choir teachers and audience members commented on my anxious stage presence. I loved to sing with other people in unison or harmony, but when it came to solos, I was a nervous wreck. I was the recipient of the “Every Which Way but Loose” award in high school choir because onstage, I simply couldn’t relax and enjoy performing. Performance anxiety was front and center at every concert, and it often stole my spotlight.

Continue reading

Four Common Ways Anxiety Manipulates You and Causes Symptoms

Four Common Ways Anxiety Manipulates You and Causes Symptoms

There are common ways that anxiety manipulates you and causes symptoms. Anxiety tries to control your life by manipulating you with these four tactics.

Anxiety manipulates you. It’s not just you, of course, but anxiety would like you to believe that it’s only you. Anxiety is insidious, creeping and crawling through your brain, your mind, and your body. Anxiety causes its own symptoms but blames them on you. When you live with anxiety, you are dealing with this thing that takes on a life of its own and controls how you view yourself, others, and the world in general. There are things anxiety does to manipulate you and cause symptoms. 

Continue reading

Anxiety and Panic Overstimulate the Brain–Mindfulness Helps

Anxiety and Panic Overstimulate the Brain–Mindfulness Helps

Anxiety and panic often overstimulate the brain by pulling in too much sensory information. Mindfulness helps during these times of panic. Here's why.

Anxiety and panic can overstimulate the brain, rocket our senses into hyperactivity, and make us feel wired. When we feel keyed-up and on edge, it can feel as though nothing will help. Here we are at risk of jumping right out of our own skin, which would do nothing more than increase both anxiety and panic, and there’s not a thing we can do to settle down. Or is there? It can seem counter-intuitive, but practicing mindfulness when we’re at our most agitated can help when anxiety and panic overstimulate your brain. 

Continue reading

Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD): Leave Worry at the Door

Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD): Leave Worry at the Door

Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) comes with baggage that you can leave at the door. Learn to leave anxiety at your door and better manage your GAD.

Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a relentless experience of anxiety and worry. Worry and anxiety are part of the human experience; there’s even a type of anxiety known as existential anxiety that we feel simply because we exist. However, the anxiety and worry of GAD go far beyond ordinary anxiety. Regardless of the type of anxiety you experience, even if it’s a diagnosable disorder such as GAD, you can find peace as you learn to leave worry at the door. 

Continue reading

Social Anxiety, Dread of Meeting New People

Social Anxiety, Dread of Meeting New People

People experiencing social anxiety can feel dread when meeting new people. Learn three tips for lowering social anxiety and dread so you can meet new people.

When it comes to meeting new people, social anxiety instills in its sufferers a sense of dread. Having to meet new people can sound alarms and ignite warning fires in the minds and bodies of those living with social anxiety (Extroverts Can Experience Social Anxiety, Too). In response to the fires, fire walls within the brain pop up, sealing off areas like rational thought and peaceful feelings so that all attention is funneled to the fire. The fire is a signal of danger—of stranger danger—and it makes us dread meeting new people. What we often don’t realize is that we are in charge of the alarm, the fire, even social anxiety itself. You don’t have to forever dread meeting new people. 

Continue reading

Panic Attacks and Anxiety Attacks are Real

Panic Attacks and Anxiety Attacks are Real

Panic attacks and anxiety attacks are real, but many people think they're made up. Learn what anxiety attacks and panic attacks are and why they are real.

People who live with anxiety and panic know that panic and anxiety attacks are real. Unfortunately, not everyone understands that panic attacks and anxiety attacks are legitimate physical and emotional experiences. Recently, I was watching a show in which a character’s doctor informed him that he had had a panic attack. When this character told his sister, she exclaimed in disbelief, “Are those a thing? I thought panic attacks were something made up by celebrities for attention.” To help increase understanding, I offer an explanation for why panic attacks and anxiety attacks are real. 

Continue reading

How to Respond to Anxiety When It Says ‘You Can’t Do That!’

How to Respond to Anxiety When It Says ‘You Can’t Do That!’

How do you respond to anxiety when it says you can't do something? Do you believe anxiety? If so, here's how to respond when anxiety says "you can't do that."

When anxiety says you can’t _____ (fill in the blank with whatever it is you think you can’t do), it’s frustrating, and it can be tempting to give up. Why bother trying to move forward when anxiety is screaming at you, attempting to convince you that you can’t do something? There are important reasons we should bother moving forward despite being anxious and believing we can’t do something: We are living our lives, we have goals, passions, and purpose, and anxiety is wrong (12 Lies Anxiety Tells You). You can respond to anxiety to take away its voice. You can respond when anxiety says you can’t do something.

Continue reading

Anxiety and Exhaustion: Wired and Tired

Anxiety and Exhaustion: Wired and Tired

Anxiety and exhaustion often appear together and leave people feeling wired and tired at the same time. Learn why and get tips to reduce their effects here.

Anxiety and exhaustion frequently go hand in hand. Feeling anxious day after day is exhausting, and when we’re so worn out, anxiety worsens because managing it becomes more difficult. The fatigue of anxiety often feels different than the exhaustion of depression. Whereas depression can zap people of energy and motivation and make it difficult to be up and about, anxiety can put people on almost constant alert, leading to a sensation often described as tired and wired. Increasing awareness of anxiety and exhaustion can help you take measures to feel better physically, mentally, and emotionally.

Continue reading

Don’t Let Anxiety Ruin Your Relationships

Don’t Let Anxiety Ruin Your Relationships

Anxiety has a way of ruining relationships, making us feel unlucky in love. As anyone who has ever had a relationship involving two people and an annoying third wheel—anxiety—knows, love can be hard to feel and enjoy when anxiety gets in the way. Take heart: there are things you can do to keep anxiety from ruining your relationship.

Continue reading


Follow Us

  • advertisement

in Anxiety-Schmanxiety Comments

Mental Health Newsletter

Sign up for the HealthyPlace mental health newsletter for latest news, articles, events.

Mental Health
Newsletter Subscribe Now!

Mental Health Newsletter

Sign up for the HealthyPlace mental health newsletter for latest news, articles, events.

Log in

Login to your account

Username *
Password *
Remember Me