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Our Mental Health Blogs

Anxiety While Driving — Conquering Life’s Left Turns with GAD

Anxiety While Driving — Conquering Life’s Left Turns with GAD

Anxiety while driving commonly affects people with anxiety disorders and without. My anxiety while driving hasn't kept me home. Explore driving anxiety here.

Anxiety while driving is commonplace for me. Due to generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), my brain magnifies my anxiety while driving. Even driving to a nearby store turns into a worst-case scenario in my mind’s eye. Some of this anxiety seems reasonable. Other fears involve driving activities that don’t distress the average person. When I drive, there is a specific driving anxiety I can’t conquer. I have a fear of getting into a car accident while making left turns in traffic.

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Is Anxiety a Real Mental Illness?

Is Anxiety a Real Mental Illness?

Is anxiety is a real mental illness? Learn why anxiety is a real mental disorder--and also when it is not a mental disorder. Let's clear it up. Read this.True or false: Anxiety is a real mental illness? That is a bit of an irritating question, isn’t it? For one thing, it’s a true-or-false question, and those are inherently obnoxious. I’ve never been a black-and-white thinker, and from kindergarten through graduate school, I struggled with true-or-false questions because I couldn’t see absolutes. Things haven’t changed for me in this regard. Regarding the statement “anxiety is a real mental illness,” I can see that the statement is both true and false. I realize that this is a vague and probably unsatisfactory answer to a hotly debated topic. Here’s a look at that question and its answer (or lack thereof).

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Increase Your Uncertainty Tolerance and Decrease Anxiety

Increase Your Uncertainty Tolerance and Decrease Anxiety

Increasing your uncertainty intolerance can reduce anxiety. You can decrease your anxiety and lift the limits it imposes on your life--here's how. Take a look.

If you increase your uncertainty intolerance, your anxiety level will decrease. Facing uncertainty—not knowing what is going to happen in your life on both big and small scales—can cause or increase anxiety. Being really uncomfortable with uncertainty, officially called uncertainty intolerance (and sometimes referred to as fear of the unknown), is common in people living with anxiety. If you find yourself worried, anxious, and stressed when you can’t predict what’s going to happen, here’s a helpful certainty: you can do something about this type of anxiety and increase your uncertainty intolerance, and overall mental health, in the process.

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Health Insurance Anxiety–Minding the Gap

Health Insurance Anxiety–Minding the Gap

My health insurance anxiety is peaking because I can no longer afford insurance. I'm terrified. I have three anxiety disorders. What am I supposed to do now?

My anxiety over health insurance since my divorce 15 months ago, is increasing daily. While married, I was covered as a dependent under Tricare, the military’s insurance. When I moved to Idaho and eventually divorced, I found myself in what is called “the gap” in Idaho’s health care coverage.1 It is a hole in Idaho’s health insurance plan where thousands of Idahoans do not have affordable access to healthcare coverage. Because my daughter is on her father’s insurance, I am not eligible for Medicaid. As it stands, I receive no tax credit for insurance because of my income bracket. Therefore, affordable rates for health insurance aren’t available to me. I need anxiety treatment, and this anxiety over health insurance is not helping.

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Stop the Anxious Running Commentary in Your Head

Stop the Anxious Running Commentary in Your Head

A non-stop anxious running commentary in your head makes you feel overly worried or afraid. Learn to quiet the anxious running commentary through understanding.Anxiety jabbers incessantly, creating maddening and anxious running commentary in our heads. To make it worse, anxiety acts as a translator and interprets what we hear and see, twisting things into its own warped ideas. With anxiety translating messages we receive, we often misinterpret the world around us. Anxiety’s untrustworthy thoughts lead to self-doubt, faulty reasoning, negative beliefs, overthinking, and overanalyzing. Becoming aware of how the anxious voice in your head translates our incoming messages is an important step in correcting the translations and quieting the anxious running commentary that interrupts your inner speech.

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When Should You See a Doctor for Anxiety?

When Should You See a Doctor for Anxiety?

Knowing when you should see a doctor for anxiety symptoms can lead to meta-anxiety, or anxiety about anxiety. Learn when you should see a doctor for anxiety.

As life-disrupting and misery-creating as anxiety can be, it’s often difficult to know when you should see a doctor about anxiety symptoms. Learning when you need anxiety help will help you feel more confident and less anxious about your decision. Use the following information to help you decide if and when you should see a doctor for anxiety.

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Introduction to Cheryl Slavin, Author of ‘Anxiety-Shmanxiety’

Introduction to Cheryl Slavin, Author of ‘Anxiety-Shmanxiety’

Cheryl Slavin, author of "Anxiety-Schmanxiety" has been diagnosed with several anxiety disorders. Read about how Cheryl continues to learn about anxiety.I’m Cheryl Slavin, the new co-author of Anxiety-Schmanxiety. I have had symptoms of my primary disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), since I was five years old. Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) was also an early companion. As the sixth grade’s favorite dodgeball target, I was bullied in elementary school and developed social anxiety disorder (SAD). I am also afflicted with bipolar disorder.

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What Is Defusion and How Does It Reduce Anxiety?

What Is Defusion and How Does It Reduce Anxiety?

Defusion is a tool to help you reduce anxiety by separating yourself from anxiety. Read more about what defusion is and how you use it to reduce anxiety.

Defusion means becoming unstuck from something, in this case, anxiety. Anxiety often looms large. It consumes our thoughts and emotions and it impacts our actions, too. Anxiety sticks to us, and we to it when all of our time and energy, thoughts and feelings, actions or lack of action are fused with anxiety. To reduce anxiety, we need to separate ourselves from anxiety. In acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), this is called defusion. Defusion can really help with anxiety.

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Social Anxiety and Performance Anxiety Aren’t Your Directors

Social Anxiety and Performance Anxiety Aren’t Your Directors

Social anxiety and performance anxiety share a theme. Knowing the similarity can help you conquer social and performance anxiety. Try this anxiety-reducing tip.

Social anxiety and performance anxiety both involve a great deal of fear, worry, and dread. When it comes to anxiety in general, that’s not unique. All types of anxiety disorders involve some type of fear, a whole lot of worry, and an overarching sense of dread. It’s the nature of the anxious thoughts and emotions that define a particular type of anxiety. With social anxiety disorder, the apprehensions largely involve fear of being judged or embarrassed in social situations. In this, social anxiety is a close cousin of another type of anxiety: performance anxiety. Understanding their relationship will help you reduce both social anxiety and performance anxiety.

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Why Hearing ‘Just Get Over It’ Doesn’t Help Anxiety

Why Hearing ‘Just Get Over It’ Doesn’t Help Anxiety

Being told to just get over anxiety doesn't help anxiety. Learn why as well as some strategies for dealing with being told to just get over anxiety.

If you live with anxiety, chances are pretty good that you’ve heard a well-meaning family member or friend tell you, “Just get over it,” “Just get over anxiety.” If it were that easy, no one would have anxiety because we’d all get over it and move on (‘Get Over It’ Is Unhelpful Advice for Mental Illness Sufferers). Unfortunately, the idea of just getting over it doesn’t help anxiety, and being told to do so can make it worse. Why doesn’t hearing “Just get over it,” fail to help anxiety? What can you do about it?

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