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Exposure Therapy for OCD: Facing Obsessive-Compulsive Fears

Exposure Therapy for OCD: Facing Obsessive-Compulsive Fears

“If you drink too much caffeine your head will explode,” my son said today. I reassured him that while too much caffeine isn’t healthy, heads don’t explode from overindulgence. Explaining the irrational nature of his fears puts my son’s mind at ease. But what if he had Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder? Maggie, our guest on the HealthyPlace Mental Health Radio Show, says Exposure Therapy is far more effective treatment for OCD than explanations and reassurance.

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Mental Health and the Value of Being (as Stubborn as Humanly Possible)

Mental Health and the Value of Being (as Stubborn as Humanly Possible)

There’s a lot about anxiety that I don’t know, but I do know that no matter what variety you’re dealing with, it’s tough. I can’t afford to just sit around and let the waves roll in, no matter how much that might seem like a good idea sometimes.

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Lonely or Just Alone?

Lonely or Just Alone?

There are people who think loneliness and children with psychiatric illness go hand in hand in a vicious circle–a child’s illness causes him to withdraw; his withdrawal causes society to retreat from him even further. There are others who define themselves as introverts and insist they are not “mentally ill,” they are “just” introverts.

Which came first–the introverted chicken, or the mentally ill egg?

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Vagus Nerve Stimulation: What is Vagus Nerve Stimulation? (pt. 1)

Vagus Nerve Stimulation: What is Vagus Nerve Stimulation? (pt. 1)

Ten to thirty percent of depressed people do not achieve meaningful remission on antidepressants. There are many reasons for this, but one of them simply comes down to this: we don’t understand the brain. The brain is a lumpy, gooey mush of chemicals floating inside our skull. If we transported a modern day computer back 100 years and people had to decode it, they would have the same experience we have with the brain. They’d give it a go, and probably find success here and there, but overall they’d just be as confused as all get out.

And this is why some people don’t find meaningful relief from medication – we don’t really know what’s wrong with them in the first place. This is why brain stimulation techniques are being developed.

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Obstacles to Developing Internal Communication

Obstacles to Developing Internal Communication

When I was first diagnosed with Dissociative Identity Disorder, I did what I always do when faced with something I have no idea how to handle: I went to the library. As a rule, I don’t read autobiographical accounts of DID but I voraciously digested everything else I could get my hands on. Most of the literature agreed on the basics of Dissociative Identity Disorder treatment, including the consistent message that establishing internal communication is an essential first step, second only to stabilization. “Ask inside” quickly became the most irritating, eye-roll inducing directive I heard. I hated it for one reason: it didn’t work.

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Managing Bipolar Disorder Symptoms on the Job

Managing Bipolar Disorder Symptoms on the Job

Peter Zawistowski discusses managing bipolar disorder symptoms on the job in a blog at HealthyPlace called Work and Bipolar or Depression. Learn more here.

It seems to me that navigating life with a mental illness is a full-time occupation. Not only that, it can feel awfully futile at times – like Sisyphus ceaselessly rolling his rock up a mountain only to watch it tumble back down again. Employed or not, the 2 million plus Americans with bipolar disorder are certainly working. Marked by shifts between dramatically high and low moods, bipolar disorder is a serious psychiatric condition that can be fatal, particularly during depressive episodes. I suspect that managing the symptoms of bipolar disorder is a job in and of itself.

Bipolar Disorder Symptoms And Job Performance

Peter Zawistowski discusses managing bipolar disorder symptoms on the job in a blog at HealthyPlace called Work and Bipolar or Depression. Learn more here.But earning a paycheck is a source of pride for many people. A sense of accomplishment can be comforting and motivating, perhaps most notably for people who struggle with mental health conditions. It’s a special kind of defeat when mental illness stands in the way of employment, and bipolar disorder does exactly that for many people. Others are able to function and even thrive on the job despite the symptoms of bipolar disorder. How do they do it?

Peter Zawistowski is a veteran entrepreneur,  part-time television engineer, and writer. He’s also diagnosed with bipolar II. Mr. Zawistowski shares his insights as the author of the Work and Bipolar or Depression blog here at HealthyPlace.

In the blog, Peter discusses how his mental illness doesn’t bar him from the working world. He discusses the challenges of managing his bipolar disorder symptoms and shares with us some of what has been most helpful for him in the workplace. Visit the blog and see what tips can help you cope with bipolar disorder in the workplace.

The Stigma of Bipolar in the Workplace: Yes, Of Course ‘We’ Work

Read Work and Bipolar or Depression

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15 Ways To Make Yourself Feel Better After a Bad Day

You woke up this morning with dread in your heart—you slept in and were late for a meeting with your boss. When you arrived to your meeting, you started wishing you never had; this so-called meeting turned out to be a nice way to tell you that the company you have busted your derriere over for the past 2 years is doing some ‘corporate restructuring’ and you will be out of a job at month’s end. On the way home, the weather reflects your stormy disposition and you end up getting soaked in the torrential downpour in your nice new suit and splashed by an obnoxious driver.

15 Ways To Make Yourself Feel Better After a Bad Day

You woke up this morning with dread in your heart—you slept in and were late for a meeting with your boss. When you arrived to your meeting, you started wishing you never had; this so-called meeting turned out to be a nice way to tell you that the company you have busted your derriere over for the past 2 years is doing some ‘corporate restructuring’ and you will be out of a job at month’s end. On the way home, the weather reflects your stormy disposition and you end up getting soaked in the torrential downpour in your nice new suit and splashed by an obnoxious driver.

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Positive Report From School a Pleasant Surprise

Positive Report From School a Pleasant Surprise

October is one of our household’s more hectic months. My biggest time consumers are Bob’s birthday and Halloween (our favorite holiday). My birthday gets thrown in there somewhere (I refuse to cop to when or which one it is). There are about umpteen school “holidays” when the kids are home. And, of course, there’s that day that strikes fear in the hearts of parents and children alike…

Parent/Teacher Conference Day.

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There Is Hope–My Scare at the Bus Stop

A drunk man began to touch me and another woman. He refused to stop and began to be aggressive. How would I get through this situation and its aftermath without going into psychiatric crisis?

There Is Hope–My Scare at the Bus Stop

Last night, I realized the progress I’d made in therapy for my borderline personality disorder–even if I still had to call a crisis line.

I’d left a meeting in downtown Indianapolis, and was waiting at the bus stop. Only another woman was with me. Suddenly, a man walking alongside a bicycle came up to us and asked for money. When we refused, he told us he’d been beaten by the police.

I offered to call for help, but he turned aggressive. He cursed at me, then grabbed my hand and kissed it.

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Think Anxiety Away: Top Ten Cognitive Distortions

Think Anxiety Away: Top Ten Cognitive Distortions

Is it possible to think anxiety away? I know that navigating the maze of mental health isn’t easy. Sometimes I feel like it just doesn’t matter how well I’ve marked the path, I still can’t find my way round the blasted thing. Thankfully, the mind tends to (subconsciously) organize around patterns. Even when we’re struggling. Seeing the negative patterns, or cognitive distortions, will help you change them and then you can think anxiety away.

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