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Our Mental Health Blogs

My Parent Has PTSD — A Teenager’s Perspective

My Parent Has PTSD — A Teenager’s Perspective

When a parent experiences posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), it is important to understand the potential impact this can have on the children, including the possibility of secondary-traumatic stress. While children can have negative reactions when a parent suffers from PTSD, they can also thrive and develop unique strengths (A Parent with PTSD Can Affect the Whole Family). Watch as my oldest son offers his unique perspective on growing up when a parent has PTSD. 

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Introduction to Tia Hollowood, Author of ‘Trauma! A PTSD Blog’

Introduction to Tia Hollowood, Author of ‘Trauma! A PTSD Blog’

Hi, my name is Tia Hollowood, and I am pleased to be joining the HealthyPlace blogging community as a writer for Trauma! A PTSD Blog. My trauma started early on in life, but now I can say I’m in PTSD (posttraumatic stress disorder) recovery and I believe that sharing our experiences can help us all (Telling Your Trauma Story: Why You Really Should).

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A Parent with PTSD Can Affect the Whole Family

A Parent with PTSD Can Affect the Whole Family

There are things to keep in mind when a parent has posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD doesn’t only affect the trauma survivor, it affects the whole family–including the children. As a parent with PTSD, I think that it’s easy to get caught up in what having it feels like for me, and it’s easy to forget that it’s also affecting those around me, including my husband and my stepson (Can Combat PTSD Get Transmitted to Children From Their Parents?). My husband also has PTSD, so it’s fairly easy for him to deal with my PTSD symptoms because he has them too. But before I started this post, I really stopped and thought about how it is for my stepson and other children who have parents with PTSD.

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PTSD Recovery: Asking For Help

PTSD Recovery: Asking For Help

An important element of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) recovery is to ask for help; but that didn’t come naturally for me (Are You Afraid To Ask For Mental Health Help?). My PTSD was caused by domestic violence while I was growing up in an alcoholic household. I learned at an early age to never ask for help and I had to overcome that learned behavior in order to recover. In my PTSD recovery, I had to learn to ask for help.

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PTSD Recovery Program: How To Help Someone With PTSD

PTSD Recovery Program: How To Help Someone With PTSD

A posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) recovery program often requires a network of supporters for the PTSD sufferer that includes loved ones, friends, doctors and even coworkers. This is because posttraumatic stress disorder doesn’t only affect those who are diagnosed with it. Usually, many people play a part in the sufferer’s PTSD recovery program. Sometimes it’s hard to know how to handle it when someone with PTSD is triggered, anxious, or depressed — what to say or do to make the situations better. These are muddy waters to navigate, but it can be done. You are able to help someone through their PTSD recovery program.

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About Jami DeLoe, Author of “Trauma! A PTSD Blog”

About Jami DeLoe, Author of “Trauma! A PTSD Blog”

Hi, my name is Jami DeLoe and I am thrilled to be joining the HealthyPlace.com blogging community as a writer for Trauma! A PTSD Blog. I was diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) about four years ago, after suffering with it for well over 20 years. Read on to learn more about my journey with PTSD.

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Intense Focus -> Calm Mind: Walking with Water!

Intense Focus -> Calm Mind: Walking with Water!

In my previous video about walking meditation, I spoke a little about meditation in general, pointing out that not all meditation is done while sitting. One can also meditate while walking. In some ways, this is quite possibly the best way to meditate.

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After Sexual Assault – Establishing Personal Physical Safety (pt 2)

After Sexual Assault – Establishing Personal Physical Safety (pt 2)

Recovery from, or prevention of, sexual assault – this is our concern, in this pair of videos. As my blog co-author, Michele Rosenthal, has told us, “‘self-efficacy’ refers to one’s ability to feel ‘effective’”, and achieving that must be a part of your recovery or prevention project. She also referred us to psychologist Albert Bandura’s assertion that self-efficacy derives from one’s ability to feel confident in specific situations.

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After Sexual Assault – Establishing Personal Physical Safety – I

After Sexual Assault – Establishing Personal Physical Safety – I

Any sexual assault event leads naturally to a question: how can one get back one’s sense of personal safety, after such a catastrophe? Michele’s July 24 blog post – PTSD and Self-Efficacy: Being Able to Protect Yourself – launches into this question, and it got a distinct reaction from me. I urgently wanted to add something to what she had to say – a male perspective on the problem of personal safety and how to achieve it.

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Children and Trauma: How To Notice the Signs

Children and Trauma: How To Notice the Signs

When you see a child acting out and misbehaving, or an adult who seems unable to focus, connect or control emotions, how often do think to yourself, “Hmmm, I wonder if there’s trauma in that person’s background…” More often than not we just blame and feel abused and/or frustrated by such behaviors – even when they’re our own.

Understanding the link between childhood trauma and negative behavior patterns can be critical to treating them.

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