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Empathy for Yourself and Others in Eating Disorder Recovery

Empathy for Yourself and Others in Eating Disorder Recovery

Eating disorder recovery requires that you show empathy to yourself and others. But remembering how to show empathy may not come easy. Read these tips.

It’s important to show empathy to yourself and others in eating disorder recovery. It’s vital for our loved ones to be able to show empathy for us as we journey towards recovery. It’s also vital to be able to show empathy for ourselves because empathy will help to keep us in eating disorder recovery. Here’s how to show empathy to yourself and others in eating disorder recovery.

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One Important Thing You Don’t Know About Eating Disorders

One Important Thing You Don’t Know About Eating Disorders

Here’s one important thing you don’t know about eating disorders. Take a look, because knowing this about eating disorders could save your loved one's life. There are important things you don’t know about eating disorders because for many people, eating disorders are a mystery. If you’ve never had one, you may struggle to come up with anything about them. I’ve heard people fumble, “It’s when you don’t eat or think you’re fat right?” Yes and no. Eating disorders are multifaceted. They’re a mental illness many people can struggle with for life. Here’s one important thing you don’t know about eating disorders.

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How to Talk to Someone with Disordered Eating Around the Holidays

How to Talk to Someone with Disordered Eating Around the Holidays

How do you talk to someone with disordered eating around the holidays? The holiday season is a time of gathering and lots of food. The average person may complain of overindulging and gaining some turkey or pie weight. But for the person with an eating disorder, the joy of the holidays can be a time filled with anxiety (Surviving [and Thriving] During the Holidays With An Eating Disorder). Food is a part of celebration but for those with disordered eating, it can be difficult to maintain stability or stay on the recovery path. Added to that stress are the dreaded looks or awkward questions of friends and family members. Here’s how to be a supportive person and talk with someone with disordered during the holiday celebrations.

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Recover in Community to Heal Eating Disorders, Addictions

Recover in Community to Heal Eating Disorders, Addictions

We recover in community. We may think that our eating disorders, or addictions, separate us from others (Never Alone: Overcoming the Loneliness of Eating Disorders). We may think that no one understands, that we’re unique in our “specialness,” or our suffering. Then we enter therapy, a facility, or a group, and we begin to see that we’re not as unique as we thought. Our “special” form of suffering is shared by others, and guess what, they understand us. They don’t just try to listen and sympathize. They actually understand us because they’ve gone through the same things. One of the key factors in eating disorder recovery is connection to others, because we recover in community. Here’s three ways to connect in recovery.

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3 Ways Eating Disorders Make Us Feel Invisible

3 Ways Eating Disorders Make Us Feel Invisible

Eating disorders can make us feel invisible. If we’re anorexic, strangers stare at us on the street, watch cautiously as we order coffee taking note of the calorie content, perhaps feeling confusion or pity in their hearts for us. If we’re bulimic or have binge eating disorder, we may weigh a “normal” weight so we may not be stared at or confronted by family or friends, but inside we’re holding a heavy monster of a secret. No matter what specific form our eating disorder takes, there’s a level in which eating disorders makes us feel invisible. 

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Ways to Make Food Your Friend in Eating Disorder Recovery

Ways to Make Food Your Friend in Eating Disorder Recovery

Making food your friend in eating disorder recovery is a scary notion. For many of us, food has become something to be feared, rationed, avoided, or lied about. Food has become a source of greed and pain, purging and sorrow, restriction and pride. We use food in unhealthy ways to regain our sense of control over the spinning world around us, and the pain in our lives. As much as we dismiss the food, the obsession with it grows until it becomes a thing of love and hate, want and fear. But food is much more than this. It’s time that we made food our friend in eating disorder recovery. 

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This Holiday, Please Don’t Say These Things About My Eating Disorder

This Holiday, Please Don’t Say These Things About My Eating Disorder

Patricia also made a great video about a year and a half ago about how to prepare for triggers in social situations. And while the food is panic-provoking, that is only half the battle. You also have to deal with people. I see family every year (which I look forward to) but because I only see these folks once or twice a year, I drive myself crazy wondering if I’m fatter or thinner than they saw me last. And, being well-meaning, loving people, my family want to tell me all sorts of supportive things about how great I look now that I’m in recovery. But, please, don’t say these things about my eating disorder.

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How My Attitude Affects Your Eating Disorder Recovery

How My Attitude Affects Your Eating Disorder Recovery

I was hospitalized in an inpatient facility for a few days recently (not for my anorexia, but a comorbid condition). I was there long enough to see some patient turnover and was reminded just how much the attitudes of people you are in treatment with can affect you. In school, we call this the “therapeutic milieu.” I prefer to think of it as the general “vibe” of the unit.

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My 24-Year-Old Self Had An Eating Disorder (Part 1)

My 24-Year-Old Self Had An Eating Disorder (Part 1)

Roughly 10 years ago this week, I was moving out on my own and attending graduate school. Many other big changes were happening at the same time in my life, but looking back, I can honestly say that those two had the biggest impact on my eating disorder spinning out of control around that time. It is no surprise that major life changes or transitions can, unfortunately, be triggers for a number of events or conditions in one’s life, including eating disorders.

Here’s a bit about my experience on this and how it related to my mental illness.

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Tailoring Therapy for Your Needs in Eating Disorder Recovery

Tailoring Therapy for Your Needs in Eating Disorder Recovery

If you’ve read my blog for a while, you’ll remember that my eating disorder recovery started a little over 6 years ago when I found myself in the hospital, facing the physical consequences of binging and purging since I suffered from bulimia for most of my life as a young adult.

What I haven’t  focused on in previous posts, was that at the time I decided to get better, I didn’t have the resources to see a therapist, nor was our public health system available to help as I would have liked. So, not unlike many others facing an illness with a lack of adequate resources or treatment options, I did what I could on my own at first to pick myself up from rock bottom.

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