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Our Mental Health Blogs

Surviving Life Transitions in a Marriage with Mental Illness

Surviving Life Transitions in a Marriage with Mental Illness

Keeping a marriage together while you balance life transitions with mental illness can feel impossible. It’s taken my husband and me almost 16 years to anticipate and manage transitions in life. After many missteps, we have learned a few techniques that help our marriage with mental illness survive life’s transitions (Why Is Even Good Change Sometimes So Hard?). 

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What to Consider Before a Bipolar Pregnancy: Your Marriage

What to Consider Before a Bipolar Pregnancy: Your Marriage

Your marriage is something to consider before a bipolar pregnancy. When you live with bipolar disorder, whether or not you should get pregnant is a difficult decision (Why I Chose to be a Mother Despite My Bipolar Disorder). There is a lot to consider before a bipolar pregnancy, and the stability of your marriage needs to be at the very top of this list. 

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For the Mom Considering Suicide

For the Mom Considering Suicide

For the mom considering suicide, please don’t give up (What to do if You Are Suicidal). I know what it feels like to be so tired and so desperate that nothing feels more appealing than just not being here anymore. But please listen to me, mama: you are worth saving. You are worth fighting for. Your family is worth fighting for, and they need you to be well so they can be well. So, friend, if you are considering suicide, if you think your family might just be better off with you, this is for you.

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Vacation Well With Your Spouse Despite Mental Illness

Vacation Well With Your Spouse Despite Mental Illness

It is entirely possible to vacation well with your spouse despite mental illness (Marriage and Mental Illness: Take a Vacation Alone Together). But, one of the hardest things about having a mental illness is that you can’t take a vacation from your mental illness. Even if you want to escape your life and just enjoy your partner on vacation, you still have to make allowances for your mental illness. It might feel like more work than it’s worth, but making space for your mental illness on vacation will enable you to have a better vacation.

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Marriage and Mental Illness: Take a Vacation Alone Together

Marriage and Mental Illness: Take a Vacation Alone Together

Married couples dealing with mental illness need to take a vacation. And I’m not talking about a coffee break. I’m talking about getting away by yourselves for at least a few days to reconnect and have fun together. No matter how long it’s been since you and your spouse have been on a vacation alone together, taking a vacation can do wonders for your own mental health and your marriage with mental illness.

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Summer Survival Guide for Moms With Mental Illness

Summer Survival Guide for Moms With Mental Illness

Moms with mental illness: we need a summer survival guide. At first, the lazy days of summer seem like a Godsend to the routine-weary mom. But sooner than we can run out of Otter Pops, the kids are screaming and hitting each other and complaining that they’re bored. If I’m not careful, this mama’s losing her cork before we even light the sparklers for the fourth of July. Here is a summer survival plan for all of us moms with mental illness who need a little extra help to survive so much family togetherness this summer.

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Mentally Ill Spouses Benefit from Focusing on Marriage

Mentally Ill Spouses Benefit from Focusing on Marriage

When mentally ill spouses shift focus onto their marriage rather than themselves, everyone benefits. Giving to your spouse is absolutely necessary to keep your marriage going, no matter how mentally ill you are (Mentally Ill Spouses: Give What You Can To Your Marriage). Before I became ill with bipolar disorder, I was an equal partner in my marriage. After my diagnosis and subsequent medication regiment, it was impossible for me to be the same partner to my husband. But as time went on, I found ways to give to my husband and have a better marriage despite my bipolar disorder diagnosis. I, the mentally ill spouse, did this by focusing on my marriage.

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Marriage and Mental Illness: Take Care of the Caregiver

Marriage and Mental Illness: Take Care of the Caregiver

In every marriage with mental illness, taking care of the caregiver is as important as taking care of the mentally ill spouse. Too often we focus on the needs of the mentally ill spouse and forget that the partner supporting them needs love and support as well (The Role of Caregivers for People with Mental Illness). Without much-needed support, caregivers can experience burnout. Not only can their health be compromised if they experience caregiver burnout, but they will also be unable to support their mentally ill spouse. In every marriage with mental illness, taking care of the caregiver is essential.

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Marriage and Mental lllness: 5 Steps to Revive Your Sex Life

Marriage and Mental lllness: 5 Steps to Revive Your Sex Life

In marriages with mental illness, one of the biggest struggles can be the loss of a couple’s sex life. But, you can revive your sex life. Because of the side effects of medications, symptoms of mental illness, and conflicts within the marriage, many couples struggling with mental illness are also suffering from a lack of sexual connection. But, there is hope. Here are five ways to revive your sex life in spite of mental illness in your marriage. 

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Mental Illness and Marriage: The Cost of Making It Work

Mental Illness and Marriage: The Cost of Making It Work

The cost of making mental illness and marriage work can be extremely high for both partners. After a mental illness diagnosis, there are many decisions both spouses must make that will affect their marriage.  Will the mentally ill spouse accept the diagnosis and comply with treatment? How willing is the newly diagnosed spouse to include their partner in their treatment plan? How willing is their partner to help his or her partner achieve wellness? The effects of these decisions have longstanding consequences for both partners. Whatever they decide, making a mental illness and marriage work affects both spouses’ lifestyles, finances, careers, and freedom.

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