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Our Mental Health Blogs

Introduction to Cheryl Slavin, Author of ‘Anxiety-Shmanxiety’

Introduction to Cheryl Slavin, Author of ‘Anxiety-Shmanxiety’

Cheryl Slavin, author of "Anxiety-Schmanxiety" has been diagnosed with several anxiety disorders. Read about how Cheryl continues to learn about anxiety.I’m Cheryl Slavin, the new co-author of Anxiety-Schmanxiety. I have had symptoms of my primary disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), since I was five years old. Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) was also an early companion. As the sixth grade’s favorite dodgeball target, I was bullied in elementary school and developed social anxiety disorder (SAD). I am also afflicted with bipolar disorder.

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What Is Defusion and How Does It Reduce Anxiety?

What Is Defusion and How Does It Reduce Anxiety?

Defusion is a tool to help you reduce anxiety by separating yourself from anxiety. Read more about what defusion is and how you use it to reduce anxiety.

Defusion means becoming unstuck from something, in this case, anxiety. Anxiety often looms large. It consumes our thoughts and emotions and it impacts our actions, too. Anxiety sticks to us, and we to it when all of our time and energy, thoughts and feelings, actions or lack of action are fused with anxiety. To reduce anxiety, we need to separate ourselves from anxiety. In acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), this is called defusion. Defusion can really help with anxiety.

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Social Anxiety and Performance Anxiety Aren’t Your Directors

Social Anxiety and Performance Anxiety Aren’t Your Directors

Social anxiety and performance anxiety share a theme. Knowing the similarity can help you conquer social and performance anxiety. Try this anxiety-reducing tip.

Social anxiety and performance anxiety both involve a great deal of fear, worry, and dread. When it comes to anxiety in general, that’s not unique. All types of anxiety disorders involve some type of fear, a whole lot of worry, and an overarching sense of dread. It’s the nature of the anxious thoughts and emotions that define a particular type of anxiety. With social anxiety disorder, the apprehensions largely involve fear of being judged or embarrassed in social situations. In this, social anxiety is a close cousin of another type of anxiety: performance anxiety. Understanding their relationship will help you reduce both social anxiety and performance anxiety.

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Why Hearing ‘Just Get Over It’ Doesn’t Help Anxiety

Why Hearing ‘Just Get Over It’ Doesn’t Help Anxiety

Being told to just get over anxiety doesn't help anxiety. Learn why as well as some strategies for dealing with being told to just get over anxiety.

If you live with anxiety, chances are pretty good that you’ve heard a well-meaning family member or friend tell you, “Just get over it,” “Just get over anxiety.” If it were that easy, no one would have anxiety because we’d all get over it and move on (‘Get Over It’ Is Unhelpful Advice for Mental Illness Sufferers). Unfortunately, the idea of just getting over it doesn’t help anxiety, and being told to do so can make it worse. Why doesn’t hearing “Just get over it,” fail to help anxiety? What can you do about it?

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Create a Morning Ritual to Calm Anxiety

Create a Morning Ritual to Calm Anxiety

Morning rituals can calm anxiety if you know what to include in them. Read this for tips to create a morning ritual that calms your morning anxiety.It’s possible to calm the anxiety you experience during the day simply by creating a morning ritual. Whether anxiety obnoxiously wakes you before your alarm sounds or greets you loudly the moment you’re awake, beginning the day with anxious thoughts, troubled emotions, and agitated bodily sensations is exhausting and discouraging. Yet if you create a morning ritual to calm anxiety, it doesn’t have to ruin your day before it even begins.

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You Can Let Yourself Be Anxious (Why It’s Okay)

You Can Let Yourself Be Anxious (Why It’s Okay)

You can let yourself be anxious even though your goal is to reduce anxiety. Here are several reasons why allowing yourself to be anxious is mentally healthy.

It’s truly okay to let yourself be anxious. Why? Because sometimes we all just need to allow ourselves to feel how we feel, to be okay with anxious thoughts (Letting Someone with Mental Illness Be Upset). It’s even okay to express those anxious feelings. The key is how much we let ourselves be anxious. 

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Don’t Let Anxiety Ruin Your Relationships

Don’t Let Anxiety Ruin Your Relationships

Anxiety has a way of ruining relationships, making us feel unlucky in love. As anyone who has ever had a relationship involving two people and an annoying third wheel—anxiety—knows, love can be hard to feel and enjoy when anxiety gets in the way. Take heart: there are things you can do to keep anxiety from ruining your relationship.

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Calm Anxiety Now — Step Back and Observe

Calm Anxiety Now — Step Back and Observe

To calm anxiety, step back and observe. When we're too close to a situation, anxiety can overtake us. Learn to step back and observe to calm anxiety and worry.

When you’re caught in the roiling storm of anxiety, often the best way to calm that anxiety is to step back and observe. The fear, worry, and apprehension that are part of anxiety can become strong and debilitating when we’re up close and personal with an anxiety-provoking situation. Why do we need to step back and observe when our anxiety is intense, and how do we do it? 

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Live an Anxiety-Free Life: Write Your Story

Live an Anxiety-Free Life: Write Your Story

Are you ready to live an anxiety-free life? You can actively take charge of this by writing your story of life without anxiety. Now is the perfect time to begin. At the time I’m writing this, we’re about to enter a brand new year. However, every single day is a new day with the promise of new beginnings, and you can write your story of a life without anxiety starting now, whenever “now” may be. Ready? Read on for more about how to use this new beginning to write your story and live an anxiety-free life.

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Social Anxiety and Jumping to Conclusions

Social Anxiety and Jumping to Conclusions

Living with social anxiety and jumping to conclusions is like perpetually bouncing on a crowded trampoline: We must be watchful so we don’t cause harm to others; we must avoid bumping into, and thus annoying, others; we know if we do it wrong we will surely ruin things for everyone; and we jump, jump to conclusions that we’re being judged negatively. Social anxiety is exhausting (Social Phobia [Social Anxiety Disorder, SAD]). You don’t have to remain stuck on the social anxiety trampoline, jumping to conclusions that you are somehow lesser than others. To stop jumping to conclusions and soothe social anxiety, to find some peace of mind, you must understand some of the effects of social anxiety. 

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